Other Great Metal Influences, Part 4 Rush

Whenever you ask any old rocker to name a great Canadian rock act, they won’t say Bryan Adams, they’ll tell you that it is Rush. For over thirty years this great band has stayed together and put out a string of albums over the years that have satisfied their audiences. While they may not quite have had the chart success of Aerosmith, they haven’t had all the negative experiences either, but have been consistently solid for nearly four decades.

Rush released their first album in 1974 and while it was several years later before I actually listened to it, I can see why it helped to put Rush on the music map. It features their unique blend of rock with the guitar work of Alex Lifeson and the mistakable vocals of Geddy Lee and the hard working drumming of Neil Peart. I use this album as a counter by non metal people who say that metal musicians can only play three chords.

Geddy Lee- vocals, bass, keyboards

Alex Lifeson- guitars

Neil Peart- drums, percussion

Throught the late 70s, Rush would begin to enjoy mainstream success. Albums such as “Farewell to Kings” and “2112” would establish them as one of the major rock acts. They can also be given credit for getting record labels in America to finally look north of the border and see the other acts that Canada has come to produce.

 

           

 

                                                                             

In 1981, Rush put out the ablum “Moving Pictures” which would be arguably their best. Songs like “Tom Sawyer” and “Limelight” have been favourites with many Rush fans and even a few non Rush fans. Unfortunately, as was the case back in the 1980s, the album also branded Rush a heavy metal band by some ignorant American deejays who wanted to put music into categories. As a result of not wanting to be stereotyped, the Rush sound became more synthesised in the 80s, the album “Grace Under Pressure” being the point. However, Rush managed to put out synthesised albums without being accused of “selling out” by metalheads who still bought and enjoyed these albums.

One thing that can always be said of Rush over the near past four decades is that they have always been a great live act. I have never had the fortune of seeing this great band live, but everyone I have spoken to who has seen them, can confirm this. They continue to play with an energy which masks their years and their light displays of the 80s and 90s have been described as mind blowing.

Rush is another one of those great bands from the 70s which metal acts in the 80s site as an influence. However, bands from the 90s and the 00s can probably also site them as well because Rush have been and continue to be a great influence to metal.

Next post: Queen

To buy Rock And Roll Children go to www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

It is also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

6 Responses to “Other Great Metal Influences, Part 4 Rush”

  1. Have to agree with all that you say about RUSH, Mike.I think the fact that they are genuinely a bunch of really nice guys, not full of their own importance and suckers to all the idolatry has enabled them to become a mainstay of rock music! Having had the pleasure of seeing their live show twice, I have to say that they are the most amazing live band I have ever seen-polished, professional and very very endearing! I love RUSH!!!!X

    Like

  2. 80smetalman.wordpress.com is amazing, bookmarked!

    mma betting

    Like

  3. I saw many websites but 80smetalman.wordpress.com is best ever

    tabletki na odchudzanie

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: