Great Rock/Metal Albums of 1982: Uriah Heep- Abominog

Abominog(album)

It’s another shame on me moment here on 80’smetalman. Uriah Heep were a band that I always wanted to check out but never got around to. I can’t even blame it on them being unknown in the US because they weren’t. Back in the late 1970s, when I belonged to one of those RCA record clubs, their albums were always listed for sale. Therefore, the fault totally lies with me.

I knew they were a hard rock band but that’s all I knew about them. The one song of theirs I have on a compilation, “The Wizard” is a brilliant song but I wouldn’t call it heavy metal. It took the 1982 album “Abominog” for me to discover that Uriah Heep should have been listed as one of my “Other Great Metal Influences.” At the very least, they should have gone into the “Honourable Mention” post because this album totally resonates heavy metal. In fact, I will go out on a limb and state that Uriah Heep belongs with Rush and Deep Purple as key players in the creation of progressive metal.

“Abominog” is a totally kick ass progressive metal album. It reminds me of everything I have always loved about heavy metal. There are some fantastic guitar riffs, complimentary keyboards, strong vocals and I can’t take anything away from their rhythm section either. Furthermore, I hear traces of bands like Dio, Autograph, Whitesnake, for sure in the track “Prisoner” and Hammerfall and I think there have been many a lesser known metal band who learned a trick or two from Uriah Heep who have been doing it since the early 1970s. So, I think I can say that many a band can trace their influences back to this band.

Track Listing:

1. Too Scared to Run

2. Chasing Shadows

3. On the Rebound

4. Hot Night in a Cold Town

5. Running All Night (With the Lion)

6. That’s the Way It Is

7. Prisoner

8. Persuasion

9. Sell Your Soul

10. Think It Over

Uriah Heep

Uriah Heep

Peter Goalby- lead vocals

Mick Box- guitar, vocals

John Sinclair- keyboards, vocals

Bob Daisley- bass, vocals

Lee Kerslake- drums

It has already come to my attention that Uriah Heep’s 70s material is even better than what’s on this album. I don’t doubt this but I am looking forward to my journey of discovery of a great band which almost passed me by.

Next post: Hawkwind- Church of Hawkwind

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

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8 Responses to “Great Rock/Metal Albums of 1982: Uriah Heep- Abominog”

  1. Wow – that red cover looks great on your black page – I know that is design 101 —but red is your color dude! (I admit to being a design student in the recent past) “My name is Wayne and i like how color and form go together” yes- I have a problem – but it is a good problem to have if you design a blog.

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  2. I’m exactly the same as you, apart from ‘Easy Livin’ on a compilation I don’t own anything by them. It’s shameful.

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  3. Excellent post! Thanks. Personally, I knew of and liked the Heep in the 70s — with Demons and Wizards being my favorite LP of theirs — but then lost track of them in the 80s and only got Abominog a few weeks ago. I agree that this one is great, but would note that it is quite different from their 70s stuff which was much more prog rock and less metal. I think I’ve read that they were looking to attract NWoBHM fans with this release.

    Turns out the reason I bought some new Uriah Heep CDs (this one plus 2014’s Outsider) in recent weeks is because I was lucky enough to see the current version of the band in concert here in a club in February. They put on a great show, and even though guitarist Mick Box is the only original member still in the band, the current line-up has been together for about 10 years and have been putting out some great new music/albums (for what my opinion is worth anyway).

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    • I got a lot of homework to do with checking out Uriah Heep’s 70’s and modern material. I did realise that they were more progressive in the 70s, that should be interesting.

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