Archive for Cozy Powell

Rest in Peace- Keith Emerson

Posted in Death, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on March 12, 2016 by 80smetalman
Keith Emerson

Keith Emerson

Apologies for opening my big mouth or actually typing fingers. When mikeledano posted about the death of Beatles producer George Martin, I commented that I hoped that March wasn’t going to be a repeat of January when we had so many rock legends taken from us. Well, it looks like March is going to follow January because just days after Martin’s passing, I was very saddened to read about the passing of 1970s progressive rock legend, Keith Emerson. According to internet reports, Keith died, aged 71, from a self inflicted gunshot wound at his home in California.

Keith Emerson was one third of the great progressive rock band, Emerson, Lake and Palmer. For many of us who lived in the 70s, they were the chosen gods of progressive rock. Great hits like, “Fanfare for the Common Man” and “Lucky Man” are still fondly remembered. Keith played keyboards and many would agree with me that he was a true wizard at his chosen instrument. Just listen to “Fanfare for the Common Man” and you’ll see what I mean. In the 80s, he reunited with Greg Lake and with drummer Cozy Powell, formed ELP. I’ll definitely be visiting those albums.

I never saw them but  Emerson Lake and Palmer were said to be amazing live!

I never saw them but Emerson Lake and Palmer were said to be amazing live!

Tributes are already pouring in for Keith, including those by both former band mates. Thus, it only leaves me to say Rest in Peace, Keith and thank you for your great skills and contribution to music over the years.

 

 

 

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Great Metal Albums of 1982: Michael Schenker Group- One Night at Budokan

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2015 by 80smetalman

220px-One_Night_at_Budokan

After letting their great studio album “Assault Attack” slip through my fingers, it was the live album from the Michael Schenker Group, “One Night at Budokan,” that I finally bought. This was because I was looking for one song in particular and although my record buying rule has always been never to buy a entire album on account of one song, I was so determined to get something with the song “Cry for the Nations” on it, that I broke my rule. On this occasion, my gamble paid off because not only I got the song I wanted, I got twelve other kick ass tracks as well.

“One Night at Budokan” adds the Michael Schenker Group to the list of bands I regret not having seen live. From what I hear on this album, I’m sure that they would have totally ruled in concert. Like with so many live albums, great guitarists just use their time in the spotlight to just let loose and Michael Schenker does that so well many times here. The most stand out for me is his efforts on “Lost Horizons.” Schenker just goes into a long mad solo and I find myself lapping up every second of it. Needless to say, though I’m going to anyway, his guitar work is just as mad on many of the other tracks and it’s a shame I took so long to recognize his talents.

Graham Bonnet does not appear on this live album but Gary Barden does an excellent job at the mike here. His vocals are enough to make me wonder why I haven’t heard him anywhere else. Another thing I didn’t acknowledge all of these years is that the Michael Schenker Group are part of the Deep Purple family tree. I have already pointed out Graham Bonnet but beating the drums on this album is none other than Cozy Powell. I don’t think I need to say any more about the quality of the drumming, do I? He is recognized on the album as he is introduced to the audience who show their appreciation to having such a great drummer on stage. With all of these elements in place, it is little wonder why “One Night at Budokan” is such a great live album and yes, they also do a great rendition of the song I was looking for in the first place.

Track Listing:

1. Armed and Ready

2. Cry for the Nations

3.  Attack of the Mad Axeman

4. But I Want More

5. Victim of Illusion

6. Into the Arena

7. On and On

8. Never Trust a Stranger

9. Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

10. Courvoisier Concerto

11. Lost Horizons

12. Doctor, Doctor

13. Are You Ready to Rock

Michael Schenker Group (as on One Night at Budokan)

Michael Schenker Group (as on One Night at Budokan)

Michael Schenker- guitar

Gary Barden- vocals

Paul Raymond- rhythm guitar, keyboards

Chris Glen- bass

Cozy Powell- drums

Breaking my record buying rule on this occasion paid off. I got myself a killer live album. However, there will be a tale when I get to 1983 where doing the same would bite me on the bum. So for the moment, let us linger on the success with Michael Schenker Group.

On another note, it was an eleventh hour decision buy my step son and I will be going to this years Bloodstock Festival on the Friday only. For my step son, it will be the headliners Trivium  and Sabbaton that interest him. As for me, I’m dying to see Overkill, Armoured Saint and Nuclear Assault and of course, I will post a full account of the day.

Next post: KISS- Creatures of the Night

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

Great Rock Albums of 1981: The Who- Face Dances

Posted in 1980s, films, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 21, 2014 by 80smetalman

220px-The_who_face_dances_album

In 1985, I remember listening to a radio programme about The Who and the concluding bit stated that the death of Keith Moon in 1979 marked the end of The Who as a band. The programme went on to admit that the band would continue to tour and that Roger Daltrey, Pete Townsend and John Entwistle would all have successful solo projects, however, The Who as a band, were gone. My reaction was then as it is now, “What about the 1981 album with Kenney Jones?” For me, “Face Dances” has always been a good album but it’s Kenney Jones I feel sorry for. Because he was the replacement drummer for Moon, he didn’t get the respect he deserves. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if Jones has been relegated to a pub trivia question and that’s not fair on him. It is the exact same thing I said about Jimmy Farrar, had been Jones made it with another band, his drumming efforts would have been more appreciated.

That said, the radio programme also stated that after Moon’s death, The Who’s sixties hard rock lyrics and rebelliousness as well as their seventies creativity were gone as well. Not entirely true! When I listen to “Face Dances” I hear a little bit of both of these elements in the album. While there isn’t the crashing hard sound that they made famous in classics like “My Generation,” the elements of hard rock are definitely there in songs like “Don’t Let Go the Coat” and “Another Tricky Day” to name two. Plus, the big single from the album, “You Better, You Bet” definitely has reminds me of that creativity that radio programme praised them for over the likes of the rock opera “Tommy.”  Whichever way you want to view “Face Dances” the one thing I can say about it throughout is that you know that it is definitely The Who on this album. Their trademark truly resonates on it.

Track Listing:

1. You Better, You Bet

2. Don’t Let Go The Coat

3. Cache Cache

4. The Quiet One

5. Did You Steal My Money

6. How Can You Do It Alone

7. Daily Records

8. You

9. Another Tricky Day

The Who

The Who

Roger Daltrey- vocals

Pete Townsend- guitar, vocals

John Entwistle- bass, vocals

Kenney Jones- drums

Hopefully, I have provided sufficient evidence that the radio programme was wrong in regards to The Who being finished in 1979 because in 1981, they put out one very good album in “Face Dances.” It showed the world that they were still a force to be reckoned with in the music world. Thinking of Keith Moon, his passing opened the way for the many drummers who would join him since. John Bonham would follow him a year later. I believe that Moon, Bonham, along with the likes of Cozy Powell, Levon Helm and Razzle are drumming away together in a better place.

Keith Moon

Keith Moon

Next post: Devo- Dev O Live

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London