Archive for Da da

Great Rock/Metal Albums of 1983: Alice Cooper- Da da

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2016 by 80smetalman

220px-Acdada

“Da da” was the final album recorded by Alice Cooper during his too drunk to remember recording it period. There was no tour to promote the album and I don’t remember seeing or hearing any publicity for it back in 1983. Therefore, like so many people then, “Da da” completely passed me by. Having read some reviews on the album from some of my fellow bloggers, I thought I would give it a couple of listens and post about it.

The first thing I noticed about “Da da” after the first two listens was that it really strays very little from the traditional Alice Cooper format, he was  known for before his drunken period. A shining example of this is heard with the opening title cut, which reminds me of the horror settings laid down in such Alice classics as “Welcome to My Nightmare” and “Goes to Hell.” The second track, “Enough’s Enough” is a fun sounding song with some good hard guitar. This could have been a single, it might not have dented the charts but it still could have been one.

With the third track, “Former Lee Warmer,” I think it too tries to recapture Alice’s glory days of the 1970s. Maybe it’s me but that song reminds me of “Steven” from the “Welcome to My Nightmare” album. The problem with it and the title track is that neither of them quite measure up to the classics. Neither song is bad, just not as good as the originals. On the other hand, he does have some fun with tracks four and five. They both sound that he might have actually enjoyed singing them but though he might have had fun with “Dyslexia,” I must give him full marks for not being afraid to bring this subject to light. Little was known with the dyslexia condition back in 1983, so well done Alice. It’s just a shame that the album didn’t make enough noise to enlighten others.

The hardest song on “Da da” to me is “Scarlet and Sheeba.” There is some good power chords here and Cooper’s voice makes the song a potential hard rock anthem. What lets the song down a little is the keyboard bit where I would be expecting a guitar solo but that’s a minor thing and the solo kicks in and makes it all better anyway.

Alice Cooper does not play any of the songs from the album when he goes live. If there is one song that may deserve to be heard, it’s “I Love America.” Not only does the song rock for me, I really love the satirical lyrics. I speculate that he’s taking the mickey out of rednecks here and the emerging blind patriotism that was beginning to hit Regan America back then. Then again, I did watch the “A- Team” on Tuesday nights. “I Love America” is the climax for “Da da” and sets things up for the other two songs to close the album. Note, the guitar solo on the closer, “Pass the Gun Around” is very well played.

Track Listing:

  1. Da da
  2. Enough’s Enough
  3. Former Lee Warmer
  4. No Man’s Land
  5. Dyslexia
  6. Scarlet and Sheeba
  7. I Love America
  8. Fresh Blood
  9. Pass the Gun Around
Alice Cooper

Alice Cooper

Alice Cooper- vocals

Dick Wagner- guitar, bass, vocals

Bob Ezrin- drums, percussion, keyboards, vocals

Graham Shaw- OBX-8, Roland Jupiter, vocals

Prakash John- bass

Richard Kolinka- drums

John Anderson- drums

Karen Hendricks- backing vocals

Lisa DalBello- backing vocals

I have now listened to “Da da” three times and I find nothing wrong with the album. There are some good songs on here and while none of them quite reach the plateau of some of the 70s greats, they were a hell of a lot better that some of the other stuff that was beginning to find its way onto commercial radio back then. But don’t take my word for it, have a listen yourself. The album is easily accessed on Youtube.

Next post: Blue Oyster Cult- The Revolution by Night

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