Archive for Dark Side of the Moon

Great Rock Albums of 1984: Roger Waters- The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 30, 2017 by 80smetalman

Proof how sometimes initial impressions can be misguided. While Pink Floyd have continued on strong since Roger Waters departed the band and it’s been said that Roger’s career hasn’t exactly flourished, (that’s a matter for debate), things seemed a lot different in 1984. There was little or no mention of Pink Floyd in this year but Roger Waters delivered a killer solo album in the form of “The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking.” Roger hadn’t left the band yet and it turns out that way back in the late 1970s, he brought the concept for this album to the band along with that for “The Wall.” He told them the band would make the one and the other concept he would do as a solo album. History can tell you which concept was chosen by the band leaving “The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking” for Roger to do as a solo album.

The similarities between the two albums come through immediately. Like “The Wall” and even “Dark Side of the Moon” the songs sometimes blend together where you have to listen very carefully or at least have the album cover with you so you can pinpoint where one track ends and the next one begins. Then again, like many a Pink Floyd album, this album can be best appreciated whilst mellowed out in a room and smoking things. It joins a great line of albums to space out to. Also like Pink Floyd’s famous album, it tells a story. The concept is about the thoughts of a man who is driving through California and how he would like to commit adultery with the female hitchhiker he picks up. It’s an interesting theme set to the music.

One thing that I noticed the very first time I ever listened to the album was that the guitarist can really wail. Teach me to read the credits before putting an album on because that was an absolute no brainer. The guitarist was Eric Clapton and he does what he always does with the guitar. There are some really cool solos throughout the album, I really like the one he lays down on “Sexual Revolution” but his presence his felt very strongly all through the album. Roger definitely achieved a major coup by having Eric play on the album but he orchestrates other instruments very effectively too. The horns and the backing vocals are prime examples.

Since it was hearing the title track on the radio that alerted me to the album, that has always been my favourite track on it. Clapton plays a killer solo on it as well and all the other elements I’ve previously discussed are there too. Saying that, the way the album is laid out, it is easy for such a song to stand out although I do like the near seven minute “Go Fishing.” After listening to the “Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking” after so many years, I’m as excited about it now as I was then.

Track Listing:

  1. Apparently They Were Travelling Abroad
  2. Running Shoes
  3. Arabs With Knives and West German Skies
  4. For the First Time Today Part 2
  5. Sexual Revolution
  6. The Remains of Our Love
  7. Go Fishing
  8. For the First Time Today Part 1
  9. Dunroamin, Duncarin, Dunlivin
  10. The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking
  11. Every Stranger’s Eyes
  12. The Moment of Clarity

Roger Waters

Roger Waters- bass, lead vocals, rhythm guitar

Eric Clapton- lead guitar

Ray Cooper- percussion

Andy Newmark- drums, percussion

David Sanbourn- saxophone

Michael Kamen- piano

Andy Brown- organ, 12 string guitar

Madeline Bell, Katie Kissoon, Doreen Chanter- backing vocals

Raphael Ravenscroft, Kevin Flanagan, Vic Sullivan- horns

When Roger Waters did leave Pink Floyd in 1985, I wasn’t worried that we had seen the last of him. After all, he had put out a great solo album a year earlier. While not different from the material he did with the band, it’s still a great one to enjoy.

Next post: Duke Jupiter- White Knuckle Ride

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Great Rock Albums of 1983: Pink Floyd- The Final Cut

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 28, 2015 by 80smetalman

I hope that everyone had a great Christmas and that you got all the music you wanted and you over indulged in good food and drink. I know I did and I drank both my gift bottles of The Trooper and Bohemian Lager. Plus, I introduced the game of beer pong to my step children.

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beer pong

beer pong

Now onto the album…

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Like most of the world, I was really excited to hear that Pink Floyd released a new album in 1983. While I was beginning to wean myself off being influenced by what others said about a particular album in my decision to buy it, it wasn’t the case here. “The Final Cut,” at least in my surroundings was slammed mercilessly by deejays, critics and some people I knew who bought it. Therefore, I didn’t. After all, it seemed everybody was saying that the album sucked.

What I and many other people should have realized back then was that any album from Pink Floyd would have a very difficult time following up their mega giant, “The Wall.” That album will always been known as one of the greatest albums of all time, as was their other classic, “Dark Side of the Moon.” Now as I am much older and wiser, (that’s a matter for debate), I am able to listen to “The Final Cut” with a much more open mind.

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First and foremost, “The Final Cut” doesn’t suck in the least but I will make the predictable statement that it doesn’t compare to either of the two classic albums shown above. In fact, I hear reminders of both those albums and their 1977 “Animals” album in it. Except unlike that last mentioned album, there are no ten minute long songs on this album. Saying that, on this album, Pink Floyd do make use of sound effects, which was trademark for them throughout the 1970s and early 80s. But what I noticed straight away is that the songs, at least the first few, take shots at Margaret Thatcher.

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What Roger Waters was trying to convey in the album was his frustration of seeing all of the liberal achievements made after World War II, where he lost his father, being eroded away by the election of Thatcher. In the very first song, Waters asks “What have we done, Maggie, what have we done? What have we done to England?” I admit that in 1983, lyrics like these would have been lost on me but today I totally understand the meaning.

Maybe it was the fact that many people weren’t quite ready for music to become too political at the time. My eyes were only opening up to such things. However, I think the music to the album is very typical of Pink Floyd and is why I loved listening to them all of these years. Like with any Floyd album, I could easily pop this one on, kick back on the couch and get absorbed into it while puffing the magic dragon. Only now, I would appreciate the lyrics to the songs much more. For me, the standout songs are the title track and “Not Now John,” which I now remember hearing on the radio and watching the video for back then.

Track Listing:

  1. Post War Dream
  2. Your Possible Pasts
  3. One of the Few
  4. The Hero’s Return
  5. The Gunner’s Dream
  6. Paranoid Eyes
  7. Get Your Filthy Hands Off My Desert
  8. The Fletcher Memorial Home
  9. Southampton Dock
  10. The Final Cut
  11. Not Now John
  12. Two Suns in the Sunset

pinkfloyd

Roger Waters- vocals, bass

David Gilmour- guitar, vocals

Nick Mason- drums

Additional Musicians

Michael Kamen- piano, harmonium

Andy Bown- organ

Ray Cooper- percussion

Raphael Ravenscroft- tenor sax

Forget what the critics said, “The Final Cut” is a good album from Pink Floyd. It contains all that I came to love about this band. Unfortunately, it would be the last one that this particular line up would record together.

Next post: Todd Rundgren- The Ever Tortured Artist Effect

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

Great Rock Albums of the 70s: Pink Floyd- Dark Side of the Moon

Posted in 1980s, Music with tags , , , , , , , , on September 28, 2011 by 80smetalman

Question: What does a metal head do when they feel like mellowing out a bit? Yes, I can already hear many metal heads screaming, “Me, mellow out, never!” But I know there are many who once in a great while like to take it down a notch. So, do you listen to Air Supply or whatever love song is in the top 10 at the moment? I say a big “HELL NO!” to that, what many of us listened to and many still do now is Pink Floyd.

Throughout the 70s, Pink Floyd put out several really good albums such as “Animals,” “Wish You Were Here” and the most popular of those, “The Wall.” I will be looking at the last one at a later date. However, it is “Dark Side of the Moon” that got me truly listening to Pink Floyd and was my official mellow out party album. I’ve known rockers the world over to put this album when having partied their hearts out and want to relax and unwind a little. The songs on this album provide the perfect atmosphere in which to do that. Also there is something to be said about the album, like many Pink Floyd albums, to be thoroughly enjoyed after puffing the magic dragon. It is probably the way one song leads straight into the next that keeps the buzz going. Even in the days before CDs when you had to pause to turn the tape over, the first track on the second side, “Money” does a great job in returning you back to the proper atmosphere.

Track Listing:

1. Speak to Me

2. Breathe

3. On the Run

4. Time

5. The Great Gig in the Sky

6. Money

7. Us and Them

8. Any Colour You Like

9. Brain Damage

10. Eclipse

Pink Floyd

David Gilmour- guitar, synthesisers, vocals

Roger Waters- bass, vocals, synthesisers, tape effects

Nick Mason- percussion, tape effects

Richard Wright- keyboards, synthesisers

One thing I need to mention is that I can include David Gilmour in that growing list of underrated guitarists. His efforts, especially on his solo on “Money” proves that he can smoke a finger board. His style helps to create the music that Pink Floyd is best loved for. So, if you ever want to relax and just go mellow for a few brief moments, then this is the album to have on your stereo.

Next Post: The Sweet- Desolation Boulevard

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle