Archive for Hammerfall

Great Metal Albums of 1983: Manowar- Into Glory Ride

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 16, 2016 by 80smetalman

220px-manowarintogloryride

The more I listen to any album by Manowar, the more perplexed I become at the fact that Kerrang Magazine called them a joke band. Maybe it was because they appeared to have fun when they made their music or possibly it was down to the fact that in the magazine’s view, the world wasn’t quite ready for Viking metal. I’ve never considered Manowar a joke then or now and the funny things is that I can listen and enjoy them after all the these years while in my opinion, Kerrang has basically sucked since the mid 1990s and I no longer read it. Saying that, I shouldn’t slag them off too much because Kerrang Radio did interview me about “Rock and Roll Children” in 2011.

One of Manowar’s albums I still enjoy listening to is their 1983 offering, “Into Glory Ride.” While it’s a small fraction below their debut album, “Battle Hyms” it’s a whale of an album nonetheless. Nearly all of the songs have the melodic high notes sung by Eric Adams accompanied by some very inventive guitar playing by Ross the Boss. Listening to the album today, I can’t help thinking that bands like Hammerfall and Gloryhammer listened to “Into Glory Ride” and thought to themselves, “Hey, these guys have something here.” Because I am convinced that both of those bands were influenced by Manowar and this album particularly.

“Warlord,” the opener is the only more straightforward metal song on here, well as straightforward as Manowar can get but it’s still a good way to start out the album. The rest of the album, all six other songs are well over five minutes and sound more progressive or viking like. The best example of this is on my favourite track, “Gates of Vahalla.” This song is rife with great vocals and Ross the Boss fingering his guitar all the way through, all seven minutes and eleven seconds of it. We can’t take anything away from the rhythm section though because Joey DeMaio and the newly acquired Scott Columbus do a brilliant job here as they do on all the songs. Only “Hatred” is longer by twenty seven seconds and while it’s a cool song, I think Adams screams a bit too much on it. Also I love the intro on “Revelation (Death’s Angel.) This one is power metal at its best.

Track Listing;

  1. Warlord
  2. Secrets of Steel
  3. Gloves of Metal
  4. Gates of Valhalla
  5. Hatred
  6. Revelation (Death’s Angel)
  7. March for Revenge (By the Soldiers of Death)
Manowar

Manowar

Eric Adams- vocals

Ross the Boss- guitar, keyboards

Joey DeMaio- bass

Scott Columbus- drums

Maybe the mainstream world wasn’t ready for viking metal or power metal in 1983. I know I would have been but sadly, it would be nearly three more years before I actually listened to any Manowar. I’ve more than made up for that since, this album and “Battle Hyms” especially.

Next post: Diamond Head- Canterbury

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London.

 

Great Rock/Metal Albums of 1982: Uriah Heep- Abominog

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2015 by 80smetalman

Abominog(album)

It’s another shame on me moment here on 80’smetalman. Uriah Heep were a band that I always wanted to check out but never got around to. I can’t even blame it on them being unknown in the US because they weren’t. Back in the late 1970s, when I belonged to one of those RCA record clubs, their albums were always listed for sale. Therefore, the fault totally lies with me.

I knew they were a hard rock band but that’s all I knew about them. The one song of theirs I have on a compilation, “The Wizard” is a brilliant song but I wouldn’t call it heavy metal. It took the 1982 album “Abominog” for me to discover that Uriah Heep should have been listed as one of my “Other Great Metal Influences.” At the very least, they should have gone into the “Honourable Mention” post because this album totally resonates heavy metal. In fact, I will go out on a limb and state that Uriah Heep belongs with Rush and Deep Purple as key players in the creation of progressive metal.

“Abominog” is a totally kick ass progressive metal album. It reminds me of everything I have always loved about heavy metal. There are some fantastic guitar riffs, complimentary keyboards, strong vocals and I can’t take anything away from their rhythm section either. Furthermore, I hear traces of bands like Dio, Autograph, Whitesnake, for sure in the track “Prisoner” and Hammerfall and I think there have been many a lesser known metal band who learned a trick or two from Uriah Heep who have been doing it since the early 1970s. So, I think I can say that many a band can trace their influences back to this band.

Track Listing:

1. Too Scared to Run

2. Chasing Shadows

3. On the Rebound

4. Hot Night in a Cold Town

5. Running All Night (With the Lion)

6. That’s the Way It Is

7. Prisoner

8. Persuasion

9. Sell Your Soul

10. Think It Over

Uriah Heep

Uriah Heep

Peter Goalby- lead vocals

Mick Box- guitar, vocals

John Sinclair- keyboards, vocals

Bob Daisley- bass, vocals

Lee Kerslake- drums

It has already come to my attention that Uriah Heep’s 70s material is even better than what’s on this album. I don’t doubt this but I am looking forward to my journey of discovery of a great band which almost passed me by.

Next post: Hawkwind- Church of Hawkwind

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

Great Rock Albums of the 70s: KISS- Destroyer

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 25, 2011 by 80smetalman

If there are any albums which I can site as being an album that converted me to metal, this would definitely be one of them. I wasn’t quite fifteen when this album came out and it would be a few months after its initial release before I actually heard any of it, but when I did, I was hooked. Before, I heard this album, my idea of hard rock was Bachman Turner Overdrive but KISS’s “Destroyer” album completely blew me away. This was in spite of my religious upbringing and some people trying to tell me that KISS were admitted Satan worshippers.

Track Listing:

1. Detroit Rock City

2. King of the Nighttime World

3. God of Thunder

4. Great Expectations

5. Flamming Youth

6. Sweet Pain

7. Shout It Out Loud

8. Beth

9. Do You Love Me

10. Rock and Roll Party

“Detroit Rock City” became a show opener for KISS for nearly the next ten years. I saw them in 85 and have the video of their 1984 tour and they opened both concerts with this song. Upon hearing it, I can definitely see why and is also why I include lyrics from the song in “Rock And Roll Children.” Of course the album includes the ballad Beth which, as I mentioned in previous postings, is the song that young rockers like me played to their girlfriends in the hopes it would lead to paradise.

KISS:

Paul Stanley- rhythm guitar, vocals

Gene Simmons- bass, vocals

Ace Frehley- lead guitar, vocals

Peter Criss- drums, vocals

While KISS would dominate rock throughout the rest of the decade and go on to be a chief influence for many of the 80s metal bands, I’m afraid my religious affiliations would prevent me from getting into more of their music after this. However, although fear of hellfire at the time didn’t allow me to admit it, this album would always stick in my mind and be a big influence on me. But it just wasn’t me, many other great bands have covered songs from this album including Iced Earth, White Zombie and even Nirvana. But my favourite cover is Hammerfall’s cover of “Detroit Rock City.” If anyone wants to know where it all began, this album was one of the doorways.

Next Post: Led Zepplin: Physical Graffiti

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to: www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Froogle