Archive for Hawkwind

Bloodstock 2016- Thursday

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Death, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 15, 2016 by 80smetalman

It’s Monday, I have returned and sobered up from three and a half kick ass days at Bloodstock. There were highs, there were lows, not many but all in all it was a unforgettable weekend of metal. If I tried to post the entire weekend in one post, I’d be typing til next Friday, so I’ll break it down day by day, starting with the day we arrived, the Thursday.

The trip there was quicker than expected, no traffic hold ups even where I expected them to be. So we got there in great time with music from Axel Rudi Pell, Kill or Be Killed and the Disturbed to serenade us on the journey. After, lugging most of our gear quite a long distance and standing in a long line to get in, we finally found a suitable place and pitched the tent. Thank God we had a trial run with the tent, otherwise it would have been hard going. Once we did that, got the rest of our provisions and fed our faces. We were then ready for the first night’s festivities.

Our tent, it's a wonder it stayed up all weekend.

Our tent, it’s a wonder it stayed up all weekend.

Group photo: Joe, Gemma, Teal and me

Group photo: Joe, Gemma, Teal and me

Our first objective was going to the new Lemmy Bar opened in honour of the legend himself. However, we were briefly sidetracked from some sounds coming out of the Sophie Lancaster tent. Being curious, we investigated and discovered a band called Sumer. We only caught the last song and a half but it sounded good, more hard rock than metal but I liked them. It could have been a good omen on what was to come.

Sumer

Sumer

When Sumer left the stage, there were no further distractions so we immediately proceeded to the Lemmy Bar. It was one of the former Bloodstock bars remodeled and renamed but the change was definitely for the good. Out of tribute to the Heavy Metal God, we all went in and each purchased a ‘Lemmy,’ (Jack Daniels and coke.)

Photo0068[1]

 

Inside was totally dedicated to the God

Inside was totally dedicated to the God

Me enjoying my Lemmy

Me enjoying my Lemmy

I wonder how many Lemmys he had

I wonder how many Lemmys he had

After we drank our Lemmys, music coming from the Sophie Lancaster tent once again beckoned. Going back, we were very fortunate to catch the final couple of songs from Irish thrash metallers, Psykosis. I only might have heard two songs from this band but they left me asking myself why these guys weren’t more known. If you have heard of them, I would love to read your feedback on them. I was impressed!

Pyskosis

Pyskosis

While Sumer and Pyskosis both provided a brief look into things to come that weekend, the main event of the night was still to come. When Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons hit the stage, they did not disappoint. Their musicianship was superb and Phil showed that he can definitely work a guitar but it was the covers performed by the band that got the crowd going. The evening was always going to be about Lemmy and deservedly so but before they got into that, there was a brilliant cover of the Black Sabbath classic, “Sweet Leaf.” The Motorhead covers followed quickly after that and that was when they brought in the big surprise. Dee Snider from Twisted Sister was brought in to sing the Motorhead anthem, “Born to Raise Hell” and it raised the roof. While playing, the band stopped so Dee Snider could say: “This year, we lost a friend, a hero, a heavy metal fucking God!” Obviously, he was talking about Lemmy and also turned out that Pepper Keenan from Corrosion of Conformity accompanied on backing vocals. Other treats included the two Motorhead classics “Ace of Spades” and my all time personal favourite Motorhead song, “Killed By Death.” Campell totally nailed these and his guitar solo on the cover of ZZ Top’s “Sharp Dressed Man” was really cool. Needless to say, a mosh pit formed for “Ace of Spades” and even I went into it. Not long after, the band left the stage and came out with one more surprise. I doubt anyone in the tent was expecting them to play the Hawkwind classic, “Silver Machine.” The tent erupted here and Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons left the stage having wowed the audience.

Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons

Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons

Here's a picture with Phil Campbell actually in it

Here’s a picture with Phil Campbell actually in it

Dee Snider moved around the stage so much, I could only catch him when his back was turned.

Dee Snider moved around the stage so much, I could only catch him when his back was turned.

However, the night wasn’t quite over yet. After Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons departed the stage, a bloke by the name of Simon Hall appeared on it. He explained that someone challenged him that if he did a roly poly (somersault,) the challenger said he would give £100 to the Sophie Lancaster Foundation which was set up to combat intolerance of alternative lifestyles. Well, somebody put news of the challenge online and it went viral. By the time Simon did his roly poly on stage this night, £1300 was raised for the foundation.

Simon Hall with some visitors

Simon Hall with some visitors

He had lots of support

He had lots of support

When we left the Sophie Lancaster tent that night, we were not only blown away by the great metal already experienced, we were also left with great expectations of what was to come the rest of the weekend. Now, I must state that I am writing about my experiences of the weekend and I’m sure there were over 15,000 different ones. If you have been to Bloodstock this past weekend, please share your experiences of this piece of metal history.

Next post; Friday

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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R.I.P. Lemmy

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Death, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 29, 2015 by 80smetalman
Lemmy

Lemmy

My wife broke the sad news to me this morning and it’s already all over Facebook. Last night, heavy metal suffered its most tragic loss since Ronnie James Dio with the passing of Motorhead bassist and singer Lemmy Kilmister, who died of cancer at his home in Los Angeles.

Ace_of_Spades

It would simply be a case of preaching to the choir if I start spouting how valuable Lemmy was to heavy metal. He defined a whole new style of bass playing and had a voice that you will never forget. But Lemmy was more than just some stereotypical metal musician. Many of his songs spoke about history, his disdain for authority and even wasn’t afraid to take on the issue of child abuse, (Daddy Don’t Kiss Me.) Furthermore and this is a given, he was a major architect behind the creation of thrash metal. Motorhead were certainly pioneers in that field.

My main regret is that I don’t paint a good picture of him in “Rock and Roll Children.” See, the night I saw Motorhead live in New York, he spent the entire night complaining about the sound and to some, he came across as a bit of an asshole. My reaction to his complaints was that he sounded fine to me, so he should shut up and play. Fortunately, I would see him again at a later date and he had no complaints about the sound, Motorhead just beat your ears to death like they always do. So, I hope he forgives me for this because right now, Lemmy joins Ronnie and so many of the other great musicians who are no longer with us and are jamming away together in a better place.

R.I.P. Lemmy

 

 

Great Rock Albums of 1982: Hawkwind- Church of Hawkwind

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 30, 2015 by 80smetalman

220px-ChurchOfHawkwind

Hawkwind didn’t come to my attention until 1983 when a friend of mine introduced me to them. While, I never heard of them, I know that they weren’t completely unknown in the US during the 1970s. My friend and many of his college buddies back in the late 1970s listened to them quite a lot. When he introduced me to them,  their 1982 “Church of Hawkwind” album wasn’t my first experience but the rather amusing song, “Reefer Madness.” After that I listened to more of their stuff so at least I could say that when I got to England a few years later and met more people who were big Hawkwind fans, I could at least claim a familiarity with their music.

Part of my familiarity with Hawkwind was this album. “Church of Hawkwind” marked a swing from more hard rock to an electronic, progressive sound. However, their brand of “space rock” never goes away in the slightest. Some way out intros by way of keyboards and synthesizers still make the average Hawkwind fan want to grab their stash and light up. I would have but I have to go to work later today. One song that really stands out is “Nuclear Drive.” I can’t explain the little details as to why but I really like the song. I also found “Some People Never Die” very interesting. The song projects the actual news report of the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald backed up by the spacey music that is the trademark of Hawkwind. It’s definitely a stand out song. “Light Specific Data” is a very classy instrumental. Really, “Church of Hawkwind” reminds me of Pink Floyd but only in the sense that this is an album where you sit back and enjoy while indulging in mind altering substances.

Track Listing:

1. Angel’s Voice

2. Nuclear Drive

3. Star Cannibal

4. The Phenomenon of Luminosity

5. Fall of Earth City

6. The Church

7. Joker At the Gate

8. Some People Never Die

9. Light Specific Data

10. Experiment With Destiny

11. The Last Messiah

12. Looking in the Future

Hawkwind

Hawkwind

Dave Brock- guitar, bass, keyboards, vocals

Huw Lloyd Langton- guitar, vocals

Harvey Bainbridge- bass, keyboards, vocals

Martin Griffin- drums

One thing I discovered about Hawkwind is that their music gives metalheads and hippies a common ground. There is much in their music for both groups to like. As far as “Church of Hawkwind” goes, this is an album for sitting down and just appreciating.

Next post: Pat Benetar- Get Nervous

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

1982: Triumphs and Tragedy

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Death, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Humour, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 12, 2015 by 80smetalman

You may remember that when I first entered 1982, I spent eight of the twelve months of that year deployed with the marines. The first six months were especially difficult because I was floating about the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean on a ship. So I didn’t get that much news especially news pertaining to music. However, one piece of tragic news that did reach my ears whilst on the ship was the death of comic actor and Blues Brothers singer John Belushi.

Bluesbrothersmovieposter

Unlike the assassination of JFK, Belushi’s death may not have been a where were you moment when you first learned about it to most people. While I can say for sure that I was on board the ship when I learned about his tragic passing, I can’t say where exactly the ship was at the time. I do know that it was somewhere in the Indian Ocean.

His career may have been short but John Belushi packed a load of things to remember him by during those few years. For us music fans, the biggest contribution to music was most certainly The Blues Brothers. His collaboration with Dan Ackroyd  gave us a brilliant album and in 1980, a hilarious movie with one hell of a great soundtrack. For those new to 80smetalman, I have visited both on here if you want to take a look. Older statesmen like me, however, will always love Belushi for his antics on the old Saturday Night Live show. I will always love his Samurai character. In 1982, a true musical and comical genius was tragically taken from us. R.I.P. John Belushi.

John Belushi as Samurai in my all time favourite one: Samurai Night Fever

John Belushi as Samurai in my all time favourite one: Samurai Night Fever

Now on to the triumph. This year saw the third Monsters of Rock Festival at Donnington Park. Attendance was up from the previous two years and evidence that slowly but surely, heavy metal was taking over the UK. A small piece of festival history was made that year when Saxon became the first band to play at there for the second time. Headlining was another British band who failed to make it very far in the US, Status Quo. I have to admit, that I haven’t listened to them much over the years over the years. Guess I should rectify that. Other players that year included Gillan, Uriah Heep, space rockers Hawkwind and Canadian metal band Anvil. While it would be another year before I would hear about this great festival, I believe that this varied line up would have been a great thing to see and hear.

HW 1982-08-21 Castle Donnington.Monsters of Rock.1.front

Like I said at the beginning, my knowledge of musical events is limited due to the circumstances. So if there is some other event from 1982, triumph or tragedy, let me know and I will post about it because it is part of our history. Call this an urgent appeal.

Next post: Status Quo- 1+9+8+2

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

Great Rock Albums of 1979: Hawkwind- PXR5

Posted in 1979, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2012 by 80smetalman

I had never heard of Hawkwind back in 1979. They came to my attention a few years later from an old friend who was a few years older and listened to them quite a lot through the 70’s and as far as I know continues to do so. When he treated me to some of their material from the early and mid 70’s, I have to admit I was rather impressed. At the time, I made many comparisons to Pink Floyd in the sense that I thought they were one of those groups you listen to when you want to sit in a secluded room while puffing the magic dragon and contemplating the meaning of the universe. I would later discover that none other than Lemmy from Motorhead fame was a former Hawkwind member and that only made me want to check them out more. I got that opportunity when I first got to England. Not one but two of the friends I made in that first year were hardcore fans and treated me to more of their music.

Confession time, “PXR5” is one of those albums I had to rely on YouTube for before I could write about it here. In fact, it was the first time I heard the album in its full glory. I remembered the great tracks “PXR5” and “Robot” and vaguely remember “Uncle Sam’s on Mars” mainly due to the amusing title. Now I can say that the rest of the album is just as good. I hear a hard rock edge to it which I like, especially with the opening track “Death Trap,” which it doesn’t loose. In short, I really like this album.

Track Listing:

1. Death Trap

2. Jack of Shadows

3. Uncle Sam’s on Mars

4. Infinity

5. Life Form

6. Robot

7. High Rise

8. PXR5

Hawkwind

Robert Calvert- vocals

David Brock- guitar, keyboards, vocals

Adrian Shaw- bass

Simon House- violin, keyboards

Simon King- drums

What I love about Hawkwind is that fact that it’s hard to put them into a nice fitting category. Wikipedia tries to by referring to this album as “space rock” and while I won’t debate that, I wouldn’t be so quick as to label them. Hawkwind have a unique sound that incorporates a bit of hard rock, progressive rock and some others. That probably makes it perfect listening for when you are in outer space.

Next post: Bob Dylan- Live at Budokan

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London