Archive for Jim Morrison

Dead Musicians Bands

Posted in 1980s, Books, Death, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2022 by 80smetalman
Dio

When I wrote “Tee-Bone Man and Superdeke’s Time Travelling Adventure” for Mike Ladano’s blog, the biggest challenge in discipline for me was not to get totally carried away with all the possible collaborations between musicians who have left us. It doesn’t take too much smarts to realize that the possibilities are endless and I could have filled many pages with them and that’s just the ones I would like to see!

Lemmy

First, I am quite convinced that every deceased musician would love to sing or play with the King, Elvis and that includes Lemmy. It would be an interesting song, that part’s for sure. Of course Lemmy wouldn’t be left out as many would like to get him to play bass on their song or sing with them and I’m not just talking about metal musicians. Why couldn’t he lay down a bass line for Jim Morrison or Janis Joplin? Then we can take it to the complete other extreme and have Lemmy do a song with Whitney Houston. Why not?

One combination I mention in the story would almost certainly happen. I firmly believe that Ronnie James Dio would have hooked up with former bandmates from Rainbow and the connection of that band to Deep Purple and Black Sabbath and formed a band with Jimmy Bain on bass, Jon Lord on keyboards and Cozy Powell on drums. Furthermore, I stand by my choice for guitar in the group as I strongly feel that Criss Oliva of Savatage fame would be the best fit for the above combo. Of course, you are all welcome to put forward alternatives.

The Fab Four
The Who

One combination which I thought of putting into the story but didn’t was a collaboration of the two deceased Beatles and two deceased members of The Who. John Lennon and George Harrison on guitars, John Entwistle on bass and Keith Moon on drums might be something to hear. We can even make it more interesting by throwing in the two deceased members of The Rolling Stones. Then again, we can get Brian Jones and Charlie Watts to play along with the two dead Doors! Like I said, the possibilities are endless!

The teacher in me has now taken over and so, here’s your assignment. Put together your own bands, duets or collaborations of deceased musicians and post them here! There are no right or wrong answers. Maybe the Righteous Brothers song I featured last week can motivate. After all, they have a point: “If there’s a rock and roll heaven, you know they’ve got a hell of a band.”

If you missed it last time, you can read the story here: https://mikeladano.com/2022/10/05/the-adventures-of-tee-bone-man-chapter-8-tee-bone-dekes-time-travelling-adventure-by-80smetalman/

To buy Rock and Roll Children, email me at: tobychainsaw@hotmail.com

To give Bruce Dickinson a knighthood, click the link: https://www.change.org/p/special-honours-committees-for-knighthoods-a-knighthood-for-bruce-dickinson?redirect=false

Great Punk Albums of 1987: Gaye Bykers on Acid- Drill Your Own Hole

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 6, 2022 by 80smetalman

Everyone’s question when they see the name of this band is: Is it just a clever name? Originally, I thought the answer was ‘yes’ because two people I know saw them live opening for such greats as Motorhead and both said that Gaye Bykers on Acid were rubbish. Therefore, for many years I ignored them. However, since I began blogging, I realized that I shouldn’t just let someone else’s opinion deter me from checking out a band on my own. Whether people like it or not, Gaye Bykers on Acid were a part, albeit a small part, of music history in 1987 and that’s why they are getting their spot here on 80smetalman.

What I like about their debut album, “Drill Your Own Hole” is that it doesn’t fit nicely into any preconceived pigeon holes. Wikipedia attempts to define the album as ‘noise rock’ or ‘neo psychedelic rock’ and I see small arguments in both cases. The opening track, “Motorvate,” gives weight to the argument as is sounds like The Doors going post punk. On the other hand, although there is no mention of it in what I’ve read about the band and this album and it could prove my insanity, I detect a strong Dead Kennedys influence on many of the tracks. Tony Byker’s guitar licks sound very much like East Bay Ray’s from the Dead Kennedy’s “Frankenchrist” album.

One track which is way out there is “Zen Express.” The intro sounds very similar to that of the theme song to “Friends” but goes more like a punked up version of The Monkees after. Another comment from a critic way back then is that the Gaye Bykers on Acid sound is the collision of punk and hippy psychedelic rock. That collision is abundantly clear on this track. The track which follows it, “Git Down,” is more like the Kennedys sound but with some wild soloing from Tony. But the track also has a bit of a swagger to it as well.

“World War 7 Blues” would be a great song for a cover from a heavy metal band. There is a definite metal vibe which you can surely bang along to. Just add some power chords. Saying that, Tony’s riffs are good on this one as well and this brings me to my next point. The glue which holds the album together is the strong bass lines from Robber Byker. You have probably already guessed that the band is all surnamed Byker but anyway, Robber does a fine job on the album.

It’s Jim Morrison meets Madness on the track “After Suck There’s Blow.” That’s the only way I can describe this track except unlike Madness, there’s no horns on the song. The remainder of the album goes out on pretty much the same vein with lead singer Mary Byker sounding like a punk Jim Morrison, interesting guitar riffs from Tommy and Robber and Kev Byker laying down a strong rhythm section. On top of that, they take the piss out of TV evangelists on “Drive-In Salvation.” I always tip my hat to anyone who does that. So, while they might have sucked live, “Drill Your Own Hole” is a decent album in its own right.

Track Listing:

  1. Motorvate
  2. Call Me a Liar
  3. All Hung Up
  4. Zen Express
  5. World War 7 Blues
  6. Git Down (Shake Your Thang)
  7. After Suck There’s Blow
  8. So Far Out
  9. Drive-In Salvation
  10. TV Cabbage

Gaye Bykers on Acid

Mary Byker (Ian Garfield Hoxley)- vocals

Tony Byker/Phlegm Lubricant/Tony Shuttleburger/Sven Eleven (Tony Horsfall)- guitar

Robber Byker (Ian Reynolds)- bass

Kev Byker/Cubehead Buffalo Hyde/Gavina Hyde/Kenny Pride (Kevin Hyde)- drums

Another amusing point in regards to the “Drill Your Own Hole” album is that the first 1,000 pressings came without the hole in the centre. So, in order to listen to the album, you had to do what the album title said. After much thought and several listens to the album, I have come to the conclusion that this is a good album but you need an open mind and a sense of humour to fully appreciate it.

Next post: Motorhead- Rock and Roll

To buy Rock and Roll Children, email me at: tobychainsaw@hotmail.com

To sign the petition for Bruce Dickinson to receive a knighthood, click the link: https://www.change.org/p/special-honours-committees-for-knighthoods-a-knighthood-for-bruce-dickinson

Great Rock Albums of 1983: Modern English- After the Snow

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, soundtracks, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2016 by 80smetalman

220px-After_the_Snow_-_Modern_English

Originally, my plan was to post the “After the Snow” album from British post punk, new wave band, Modern English, after the album from INXS. My reason was because back in 1983, I would often confuse the two bands. Worse, I would further confuse INXS’s single “Don’t Change” with the big single from this Modern English album, “I Melt With You.” Both bands sound very similar and it is possible that Modern English could have had a song on the “Rock Star” soundtrack.

I have come to the conclusion that one reason why Modern English never got the success they may have deserved was down to my beef with the 1980s. Too many people wanted to put their music into categories or genres. “After the Snow” offers a mixed bag of musical styles that makes categorizing them difficult. Track two, “Life in the Gladhouse,” is a more progressive rock song while the very next track, “Face of Wood,” might be a candidate for the “Rock Star” soundtrack. However, the track that makes my point is the one after that, “Dawn Chorus.” This song sounds like Jim Morrison came back from the dead and joined The Cult. The guitar intro at the beginning of the song definitely sound like the named band, whose albums I will be visiting a little more down the line and the vocal style could almost be Jim. Saying all that though, I really like the song as I do all of the ones on the album.

Some critic of the “After the Snow” album claims that the single “I Melt With You” is not indicative of the rest of the album. Well it certainly does stand out from the other songs but I think it goes well with the album. It provides a different turn and keeps you from getting to familiar with the album. I like the fact that you don’t know what to expect with each song and if you listen to it without stressing out over what category it should be put in, then the album becomes that much more enjoyable.

Track Listing:

  1. Someone’s Calling
  2. Life in the Gladhouse
  3. Face of Wood
  4. Dawn Chorus
  5. I Melt With You
  6. After the Snow
  7. Carry Me Down
  8. Tables Turning

Modern English

Modern English

Robbie Grey- vocals

Gary McDowell- guitars

Stephen Walker- keyboards

Michael Conroy- bass, violin

Richard Brown- drums, percussion

“After the Snow” by Modern English goes against the 1980s belief that you had to put a band into a category in order to appreciate. Their mixed bag of hard rock, post punk, new wave and progressive rock all goes well on this album. Listen to it with that in mind and you’ll definitely enjoy the album.

Next post: Journey- Frontiers

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London