Archive for Led Zepplin

Great Rock Albums of the 70s: Nazereth- Hair of the Dog

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 12, 2011 by 80smetalman

Some may be asking themselves what some of the albums I have written about here have to do with 80s metal and my answer is that each one I have written about so far have shaped me into the metalhead I became in the 80s and I still am today. However, with this post, I am going back to my true metal roots with Nazereth’s sixth album “Hair of the Dog.” It’s true that Black Sabbath, Led Zepplin, KISS and all of the bands I have listed, along with their albums, laid the foundations of what we know and love as heavy metal, but if there is any one album I can point to and say, “This is how it was meant to be done,” it is this one.

Although, I didn’t own a copy until 1981 and that was because an old service buddy left the tape in my car and was transferred out of the unit a few days later and never reclaimed it, I remember everyone talking about this album and even wearing “Hair of the Dog” t-shirts. This was before rock t-shirts became a thing of mass production. When I did hear the album, I immediately found myself headbanging away to the first track and carrying on through the rest of the album. If it wasn’t for the ballad “Love Hurts,” my head might have come off from all of the great hard rocking tracks that comprise this album.

Track Listing:

1. Hair of the Dog

2. Miss Misery

3. Guilty

4. Changin’ Times

5. a) Beggar’s Day b) The Rose and the Heather

6. Whisky Drinking Woman

7. Love Hurts

8. Please Don’t Judas Me

Nazereth:

Dan MacCafferty- vocals, talk box on “Hair of the Dog

Manny Charlton- guitars, synthesiser

Peter Agnew- bass

Darrell Sweet- drums

I am willing to bet that if I were to play this album to any metal head from the 1980s to the present, not one of them would call it “dated.” This album set the standard for what heavy metal should sound like.

Next post: Bue Oyster Cult, Agents of Fortune

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Great Rock Albums of the 70s: Led Zepplin- Physical Graffiti

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 30, 2011 by 80smetalman

Although released in 1975, this is another album I didn’t get to hear until the early 1980s mainly owing to my self imposed repression back in my teenage years. I first heard this album in late 1980 or early 1981, I can’t pinpoint the exact time. All I know was that at the time, I was in the marines serving on a troop transport, which can get very boring. Therefore, in order to preserve sanity, we opened our musical minds and explored new horizons, something I am now very grateful about.

Enough about that though, before I heard “Physical Graffiti,” my main experience of these legends of the 70s was the fourth album, which really rocks out and a few odd tracks. My mind set of Led Zeppin was the standard four piece singer, guitar, bass and drums laying down some really cool hard rock. Therefore, I was at first surprised by the wide range of music the album had to offer. However, it didn’t stop me from liking the album any less. You could say that “Physical Graffiti” helped to expand my mind.

Track Listing:

1. Custard Pie

2. The Rover

3. In My Time of Dying

4. Houses of the Holy

5. Trampled Under Foot

6. Khashmir

7. In the Light

8. Bron- Yr- Aur

9. Down By the Seaside

10. Ten Years Gone

11. Night Fright

12. The Wanton Song

13. Boogie With Stu

14. Black Country Woman

15. Sick Again

Led Zepplin

Robert Plant- vocals, harmonica, accoustic guitar

Jimmy Page- electric, slide and accoustic guitars, harmonica, mandolin, synthesiser

John Paul Jones- bass, accoustic guitar, electric piano, meltron, mandolin, synthesiser, clavinet, organ

John Bonham- drums, percussion

I always have wondered what today’s put music neatly into categories world would make today if a noted heavy rock band like Led Zepplin put out a diverse album such as “Physical Graffiti.” Would the hardcore rockers accuse them of selling out? Fortunately, back in the 7os, people tended to listen to music with a more opened mind, which is why this album was so successful and is why it is listed among the albums you should listen to before you die.

Next post: Black Sabbath- Sabbath, Bloody Sabbath

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Great Rock Albums of the 70s: Deep Purple- Machine Head

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2011 by 80smetalman

The period of 1970-71 was obviously a great year for rock as two out of the three albums mentioned so far were made then. This post makes it three out of four as I present the “Machine Head” album by Deep Purple. Again, this is another one I didn’t listen to until later in life, probably because I was only nine or ten when this album was released. However, I can say that I have definitely made up for it since and I can include it among the greats of the decade.

Needless to say, the best known track on the album is the famous “Smoke on the Water,” a song known by metalheads young and old. Even after 40 years, young guitar apprentices play those famous opening riffs when they first learn to play an electric guitar. The song did for Deep Purple and “Machine Head” what “Stairway to Heaven” did for Led Zepplin on their forth album. But like Led Zepplin IV, “Machine Head” has many other great tracks on it such as “Highway Star” and “Space Truckin” which can stand on their own and make this album great.

Track Listing:

1. Highway Star

2. Maybe I’m a Leo

3. Pictures of Home

4. Never Before

5. Smoke on the Water

6. Lazy

7. Space Tuckin

Deep Purple is:

Ritchie Blackmore- guitar

Ian Gillian- vocals

 Roger Glover- bass

Jon Lord- keyboards

Ian Paice- drums

In the eyes and ears of many metalheads and ageing rockers like me, “Machine Head” will go down as Deep Purple’s greatest album. When I finally got to see them live in 1985, I thought it was only fitting that the first and last songs of that concert were from this album, which I sing the praises of in “Rock And Roll Children.”

Next post: Peter Frampton- Frampton Comes Alive

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Great Rock Albums of the 70s: Led Zepplin IV

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 4, 2011 by 80smetalman

Of all the people in my age group I have met over the years, I have only ever met one person who had never heard the famous song “Stairway to Heaven.” For forty years, that song has been a classic anthem with rockers both young and old. I mean who hasn’t been to at least one music shop where there’s a sign on the wall banning people from playing it on the guitar in the shop. “Stairway to Heaven” is definitely among the top classics. However, if Led Zepplin had been around in the 80s, it would have been classed as their token ballad or they might have been accused of selling out by some metalheads.

While “Stairway to Heaven” is one of the reasons why Led Zepplin IV is such a great album, it isn’t the only good song on it. There is an argument for all eight songs on the album to given the spotlight. I’ve seen both “Rock And Roll” and “Misty Mountain Hop” on juke boxes and my favourite has always been “Black Dog.” Five out of the eight songs appear on the “Mothership” album. Each and every song makes this album such a classic.

Track Listing:

1. Black Dog

2. Rock and Roll

3. The Battle of Evermore

4. Stairway to Heaven

5. Misty Mountain Hop

6. Four Sticks

7. Going to California

8. When the Levee Breaks

Robert Plant- vocals

Jimmy Page- guitar

John Paul Jones- bass

John Bonham- drums

I will not debate anyone who mentions the many other great albums which Led Zepplin put out in the 70s. “Physical Graffiti” and “Led Zepplin II” already come to mind. However, it is “Led Zepplin IV” that shows the true rock talents of Led Zepplin and why it is one of the greatest rock albums ever.

Next Post: Deep Purple, Machine Head

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Great Guitarists of the 70s

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2011 by 80smetalman

When people think of the great rock guitarists in the 70s, they will almost always mention what I call the big 3, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Eddie Van Halen.  

These three were considered by many to be the top of the heap back then. Eric Clapton thrilled many with his gutsy blues style and Jimmy Page opened a door with a new style for the many metal axemen which would follow him. Eddie Van Halen was the late comer, arriving on the scene in 1978 and carrying on into the 80s, he set the standard which other guitarists could only hope to achieve.

I’m sure many would put forward arguments for many other guitarists and rightly so. The 70s did have its share of those who could smoke the fingerboard. Of that many, the three I wish to put forward here are Ritchie Blackmore, Tony Iommi and Ted Nugent.

As a teenager in the mid and late 70s, I heard many would be guitarists copying the famous riffs on “Smoke On The Water” first played by Ritchie Blackmore when he was in Deep Purple. Blackmore had a style all his own. However, considered by many to be the “master of the riff” was Tony Iommi. You only have to listen to classic Sabbath songs like “Paranoid” and “Iron Man” to see why. Like Van Halen, Ted Nugent was a late comer for me. Sure, he had been around before then but it wasn’t until 1977 when I heard “Cat Scratch Fever” on my little AM only radio, that I would eventually realise that I was listening to one of the guitar greats.

As in the above, I am definitely sure that many would suggest a lot of guitarists for the final category, the “underrated guitarists.” There were many guitarists who are considered great but didn’t fully get the recognition they deserved. However, I am going to list the three who I feel were definitely underrated back then; Brian May, Gary Richrath and Craig Chaquico.

Most of the British readers may be a little shocked that I am including Brian May here. It is true that in Britain, he was already being put in the above category. However, this wasn’t the case in the USA. While Queen were often in the charts, I don’t remember much talk about May’s guitar skills back in the 70s. In fact, one person shot him down saying that the guitar was dubbed in fifteen times when Queen albums were being produced. Boy, I wish I had a time machine. That is why Brian May didn’t get the respect he deserved as a guitarist.

The problem is when people think of REO Speedwagon, they tend to think of their more commercial stuff in the 80s and don’t realise what a hard rocking band they were back in the 70s. I am going to touch on this more in the future. But this is why their guitarist Gary Richrath, still probably doesn’t get the respect he deserves. I challenge anyone to listen to the song “Roll With the Changes” of the album “You Can Tune a Piano, But You Can’t Tuna Fish” album and say differently. When I listen to that song and most of their other 70s stuff, I fully appreciate the guitar work of Richrath.

Back in the 1970s, Jefferson Starship were considered a band that made “mellow out love songs” and just about all of their singles were that. That is why their guitarist, Craig Chaquico, didn’t get the recognition he deserved back then. However, when I hear his solos on the songs “Run Away” and “Ride the Tiger,” I know that I am listening to a man who knows how to work the six string. Chaquico was a great guitarist and fortunately for him, Jefferson Starship changed to a more rocking sound in the 80s and his talents were given more appreciation.

I know there are many more axemen I could name here and everyone is invited to contribute who they think might have been a great guitarist in the 70s.

Next Post: Great Rock Albums of the 7os, Aeromsith- Toys in the Attic

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Founding Fathers of Metal- Part 5, Free/Bad Company

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 13, 2011 by 80smetalman

Originally, I was going to end the Founding Fathers of Metal segment with Deep Purple, however, after listening to one of my many compilation albums, the song “All Right Now” by Free made me think otherwise. Free came from the same era as Deep Purple, Black Sabbath and Led Zepplin and established themselves as one of the great bands of that time and the mentioned single can still be heard on juke boxes and compilation albums forty years later.

After Free broke up, Paul Rodgers carried the rock spirit of Free to Bad Company producing a series of albums and great singles like “Can’t Get Enough of Your Love,” “Bad Company,” “Shooting Star,” “Feel Like Making Love” and “Rock and Roll Fantasy.” Throughout the 70s, Bad Company were one of the premier rock bands and were an influence on many of the great metal bands of the 80s.

Boz Burrell- bass

Paul Rodgers- vocals

Simon Kirke- drums

Mick Ralphs- drums

It is no wonder that Bad Company’s hit single “Rock And Roll Fantasy” was in the top 20 in 1979 when the metal dam began to burst. However, I will explore that more in the future. For now, let’s just appreciate both Free and Bad Company as founding fathers of metal.

Next post will start the segment of other great acts of the 70s who were a major influence on 80s metal beginning with KISS.

To buy Rock And Roll Children go to: www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

 

Founding Fathers of Metal Part 4, Deep Purple

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2011 by 80smetalman

I won’t begin by saying that I’m again preaching to the heavy metal choir, although I am, but another great band from the early 70s that can be listed as a metal founding father is Deep Purple. Formed in the late 1960s, Deep Purple went on to establish themselves as one of the top rock bands of the early 70s along with Black Sabbath and Led Zepplin. However, unlike the two mentioned, Deep Purple went through many line up changes. It is considered by many officianados that the most success Deep Purple line up was:

Ritchie Blackmore- guitar

Ian Gillian- vocals

Roger Glover- bass

Jon Lord- keyboards

Ian Paice- drums

Whenever Deep Purple are mentioned, the first song the great majority of people think of is “Smoke On the Water.” Yes, that song will go down as one of the all time classics, especially as it appears on at least 3 of my compilation albums. However, Deep Purple have many other great hits which could also be counted as classics. Hits like “Black Knight” and “Highway Star,” which have made it to compilation albums as well and other great songs like “Hush,” “Burn” and my personal all time favourite, “Woman From Tokyo.” But, when I saw them play live in 1985, I was completely blown away by the vocal ability of Ian Gillian on the song “A Child inTime” and that now also ranks among my Deep Purple favourites.

It came as no surprise to most people that when Deep Purple reformed in 1984, it was with the above line up. While the album “Perfect Strangers” was thought by many not to rank among their greatest from a decade earlier and fanned the argument that they only reformed for the megabucks, it did re-establish them as one of the all time greats in heavy metal. Having seen them live on that particular tour, not only was I blown away by Ian Gillian’s vocal ability as well as the musicianship of  the others, they had a breathtaking light show and I regret that I didn’t do it enough justice in my account of that concert in “Rock And Roll Children.” That is why Deep Purple can rightfully take their place as one of metal’s founding fathers.

I know I said last post that this would be the last of the “Founding Fathers of Metal” posts, but last week, I came to the realisation that Free/Bad Company needs to be included as well and will feature in the next post.

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to: www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Founding Fathers of Metal, Part 3 Led Zepplin

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 5, 2011 by 80smetalman

“Led Zeppllin just made music, they didn’t care if they were liked. They left that to the BeeGees.”

Wayne Campbell

Now I know that once again I’m preaching to the heavy metal choir, but one can’t talk about the founding fathers of metal without mentioning Led Zepplin. Led Zepplin were considered by many to be pioneers in the rock music industry and many bands today have them, as well as Black Sabbath to thank for their sound today.

John Bonham- drunms

Robert Plant- vocals

Jimmy Page- guitars

John Paul Jones- bass

My first experience of Led Zepplin was Led Zepplin IV or as I called it back then, “The album with the funny shapes for a title.” It contains the all time classic “Stairway to Heaven,” you know, the song that every apsiring guitarist plays in music shops when they are shopping for a new guitar. But “IV” also has some other great songs like, “Rock And Roll,” “Black Dog,” “Misty Mountain Hop” and “When the Levee Breaks.” All of these make the fourth album a killer album.

Their are many more studio album, greatest hits albums and even some live albums,if you look hard enough,  which have stood the test of time and are now considered classics. This includes their most recent “Mothership” which is a two CD release of some of their greatest hits and includes a DVD. But enough of the adverts, besides, I’m not getting paid to say that.

While some metalheads may not want to admit it, it can be rightfully said that everyone in the metal world can look to Led Zepplin as one of the founding fathers of heavy metal.

Next week will be the last of the Founding Fathers of Metal and will feature Deep Purple. After that I will visit two other influential bands from the 70s.

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