Archive for Mental Health

Great Metal Albums of 1984: Quiet Riot- Condition Critical

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2017 by 80smetalman

It is the opinion of many metalheads now and in 1984 that Quiet Riot’s fourth album, “Condition Critical” was not as good as it’s predecessor, “Metal Health.” I am one of those and my opinion is the same now as it was back in said year. But, was the album as bad as some people believe? My answer has always been a resounding “NO!” True, it’s not as good as the last one but I still like “Condition Critical.”

Quiet Riot did try to follow the formula they laid down on the very successful “Metal Health” album and I’m not just talking about the Slade cover. “Mama Weer All Crazee Now” isn’t as good as “Cum On Feel the Noize” but I never decided to head to the fridge whenever it was played on MTV. Unfortunately, some people didn’t agree with me, especially readers of Hit Parader (Motley Crue magazine) because Kevin DuBrow referred to the mag as akin to toilet paper. The magazine and readers hit out in response by giving the album negative reviews. One letter to the magazine asked “If I shoot Slade, would Quiet Riot die too?” I am glad that nobody got shot.

I think that the main difference between “Metal Health” and “Condition Critical” was the fact that the singles released from the latter weren’t the chart toppers the ones from the former were. Even I have to admit that “Cum On Feel the Noize” and “Metal Health” are better than “Mama Weer All Crazee Now” and “Party All Night.” If one was to take the singles away, the rest of the songs on the album are fairly equal. “Stomp Your Hands and Clap Your Feet” is a good song to get you moving to it. It does have a catchy singalong vibe to it. “Winners Take All” is a very good power ballad. It is definitely high up on my list in that category.  Furthermore, “Scream and Shout,” (my favourite track), “Red Alert” and “Bad Boy” are all cool tunes too. When you put it all together, it does make a rather good album.

If there is one item on the album consistent with all of the songs, which hooks me every time, it is the guitar work of Carlos Cavazo. For me, it is his guitar playing that makes the songs good and therefore makes the album. He lays down some great solos on all of the songs here, it’s hard for me to pick which one he does his best on. But if you put a gun to my head, I guess I’d have to say “Red Alert.” Still, I won’t take anything away from the rest of the band.

Track Listing:

  1. Sign of the  times
  2. Mama Weer All Crazee Now
  3. Party All Night
  4. Stomp Your Hands, Clap Your Feet
  5. Winners Take All
  6. Condition Critical
  7. Scream and Shout
  8. Red Alert
  9. Bad Boys
  10. (We Were) Born to Rock

Quiet Riot

Kevin DuBrow- vocals

Carlos Cavazo- guitars

Rudy Sarzo- bass

Frankie Banali- drums

Due to the lack of success, (Is 3 million copies sold a lack of success?) of “Condition Critical,” Quiet Riot went from headlining arenas to headlining theatres. I was going to get tickets to see them at the Tower Theatre in Philadelphia but when I went to buy the tickets, I was informed that the date of the concert had been changed to a day where I was working. I was bummed I couldn’t go. That might be what sums things up for Quiet Riot in 1984 but I still enjoy this album.

Next post: RATT- Out of the Cellar

To get Rock and Roll Children, go to: http://xotepiy.gq/oqozesa.pdf

 

 

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Great Metal Albums of 1983: Quiet Riot- Mental Health

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 16, 2016 by 80smetalman

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Here’s one reason why I was so excited about music in the Autumn of 1983. In the months leading up to when my household finally acquired MTV, we were still relying on the late night, half hour programme called “Video Rock” for our television musical feed. One video got a lot of play on that show, though I liked it and the song from the very first viewing. Sorry, no 80smetalman points for guessing it because I think you all know that it was “Cum On Feel the Noize” by Quiet Riot. Seeing this video and hearing the song, sometimes on radio, it was no wonder I was so pumped up when I went to see them open for Black Sabbath in the November. Black Sabbath/Quiet Riot is definitely in my top ten of concerts I’ve seen in my life. However, I didn’t have to buy the album, “Mental Health” back then because my sister did. Of course, I borrowed it quite a lot.

Some misguided rock officianadoes, at least they think they are, have marked Quiet Riot as one hit wonders because later albums weren’t as commercially successful as “Mental Health” and the follow up single, “Mental Health,” only reached 31 in the charts. Hey, who gives a stuff about that? Obviously, these so-called experts never sat down and listened to the album because if they had, they would have been completely blown away. I know I was.

While the two singles lead the album, there are so many great metal tunes on it and a couple I wouldn’t call metal but are good nonetheless. Take “Don’t Wanna Let You Go” for example. There is definitely a funk infusion on this song that is definitely not metal but is good anyway. Plus there’s the tribute song to the late Randy Rhoads, “Thunderbird.” It is slow and there is a piano in it but I think Randy would have still approved of it. Another observation is that lead singer Kevin DuBrow’s singing style is the same on those two songs as well as the more metal ones on the album. In fact, I think he would sound the same if he sang country/western.

What raises “Mental Health” to the precipice it stands upon is the great metal tunes on here. Everyone I know agrees that “Slick Black Cadillac” is a great metal tune and the harmonizing is done so well. I can hear a Black Sabbath vibe in “Life’s a Bitch” at the beginning of the song while “Breathless” is a straight forward in your face metal tune as is “Run For Cover.” “Let’s Get Crazy” goes more on the anthem side of things but trust me, when they played it live, it had me ready to jump out of my seat. Guitarist Carlos Carvazo is more than sufficient throughout the album but he does get his time to shine on “Battleaxe.” As far as I can remember, this was the second time I heard a track where the guitarist was just given the chance to show his stuff and Carlos rises to the occasion. “Eruption” was the first.

Track Listing:

  1. Mental Health (Bang Your Head)
  2.    Cum On Feel the Noize
  3. Don’t Wanna Let You Go
  4. Slick Black Cadillac
  5. Life’s a Bitch
  6. Breathless
  7. Run For Cover
  8. Battleaxe
  9. Let’s Get Crazy
  10. Thunderbird
Quiet Riot

Quiet Riot

Kevin Dubrow- lead vocals

Carlos Carvazo- guitar, backing vocals

Rudy Sarzo- bass, synthesizer

Frankie Banali- drums, backing vocals

Not only was did “Mental Health” propel Quiet Riot onto the metal and commercial world stage, it gave a  famous British band from the 1970s its big break in the US. Once people learned that “Cum On Feel the Noize” was originally recorded by Slade, many people like myself investigated said band further. That would mean big things for Slade with their next album, which I’ll get to in time. Besides, Mrs 80smetalman met Slade back in 1979. Like, “Pyromania” by Def Leppard, “Mental Health would be considered on of THE albums of 1983. In fact, here’s a piece of useless information my strange brain managed to retain: “Cum on Feel the Noize” squared off against “Photograph” on the MTV Friday night video fights. From what I remember, “Photograph” won by a landslide.

Next Post: Krokus- Headhunter

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London