Archive for RATT

Great Metal Albums of 1984: Waysted

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 10, 2018 by 80smetalman

Throughout my music listening career, EP’s have always been a bit of a paradox for me. I’ve visited quite a few of them over the years, Brian May’s “Star Fleet” for example. On the other hand, there has been some that I left out despite owning them myself. I’m surprised that while touring 1983, no one picked up on the fact that I never posted about Ratt’s EP. To many, it’s believed that EP’s aren’t proper albums so they don’t buy them and they’re intended to make money off dedicated followers of a band who will snap up anything they put out. While I see the point of the former, I see nothing wrong with a fan buying anything their heroes might release.

Waysted is a totally different story for me. I didn’t hear the name until 1985 and didn’t get to listen to them until I got over to England a year later and a friend was really into them. That was where I got to experience their “Vices” album and this 1984 self-titled, five song album, or EP. Every since, I have thanked that friend, even though he’s not into metal much these days, for the experience.

My overall opinion of “Waysted” is that it is just five really explosive songs. “Won’t Get Out Alive” is a great way to open any album. It definitely grabs my attention. “The Price You Pay” is just as rocking with a good harmony on the chorus and ends with a really good guitar solo. “Rock Steady” could have been the single on the album, although there is no indication that it was ever released as one. It has a good catchy vibe that might appeal to some who aren’t so keen on metal but this doesn’t make it any less rocking, especially with that guitar solo. Next comes the hidden gem on the album for me. “Hurt So Good,” no it’s not a cover of the John Cougar classic, it is a cowboyesque rock song, even before such songs would be made popular by a certain band from New Jersey. The acoustic intro pulls you in before blasting you with dual six strings. The chorus is very catchy and the vibe makes you want bob your head to it all the way through. Finally, the album closes with the eight minute long “Cinderella Boys.” This is a blues induced number that definitely grabs your curiosity. I sense that the band had a good time recording this and when it’s done, you feel that you’ve had a full album’s enjoyment despite the fact it only being five songs long.

Track Listing:

  1. Won’t Get Out Alive
  2. The Price You Pay
  3. Rock Steady
  4. Hurt So Good
  5. Cinderella Boys

Waysted

Fin Muir- vocals

Paul Chapman- guitar

Neil Shepard- guitar

Pete Way- bass

Andy Parker- drums

Like I said, “Waysted” by the band with the same name might only be five songs long but you remember all of them. It’s simply a case of quality over quantity.

Next post: I can’t say when that will be. I have had sad news this week. My mother has passed away and I will be flying to the States Monday morning and will be there for two weeks. Since the situation requires my full attention, I might not get to any albums while I’m there. I hope you all understand.

To get Rock and Roll Children, go to: https://book-fm.cf/print/free-download-rock-and-roll-children-by-michael-d-lefevre-pdf.html

 

 

 

 

 

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Great Rock Albums of 1984: Ratt- Out of the Cellar

Posted in 1980s, Books, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 14, 2017 by 80smetalman

Here’s a scene from “Rock and Roll Children.” One night, after unsuccessfully trying to get into bars, the four main characters decide to head to one of the group’s houses. While driving with the radio on, some power chords come blasting through the car’s speakers. Intently listening to whoever the mysterious artist is playing, these words coming ringing true.

“I knew right from the beginning

That you would end up winning,

I knew right from the start,

You’d put an arrow through my heart.”

The big single “Round and Round” brought Ratt into the homes of many Americans in the summer of 1984, with it being constantly played on radio and MTV. I can’t deny the fact that it is most likely my favourite Ratt song of all time although there are a couple of others that might come close. I can’t explain why this song is so good, not just to metalheads but many non-metalheads liked it too. That’s why it got to number 12 on the Billboard charts.

Like the big hit, one thing that many of the songs on Ratt’s debut album, “Out of the Cellar” have catchy intros that make your ears perk up and pay attention. True, some of the songs trail off a bit and end not as exciting as they begin but there isn’t a bad song on the album. Saying that, except for “Round and Round” the second half of the album is better than the first. It’s probably why the said single was put third on the album. A kind of high point on a more level ground. Furthermore and this is me totally nit picking here, I would have swapped “She Wants Money” as the opener and “Wanted Man” would have been fifth. The latter is a good song, I just think the former would have made a better opener.

Having heard “Out of the Cellar” on vinyl, flipping to side two, one is greeted with a great side opener in “Lack of Communication.” This song opens the doorway for the best to come. “Back For More” was the second single on the album and I liked it more than what the charts indicated. I think it only got to 27 but that never bothered me because it is a cool song. The acoustic intro makes a great change up to the album and I can’t fault Warren DeMartini’s guitar playing on it or on any song actually. However, after single number two comes the hidden gem on the album and the one to rival “Round and Round” for my affections. “The Morning After” is just a fantastic song. I love all the tempo changes in the guitars on it and how they kick in big time on the chorus. It’s hard to describe in words but even thirty three years on, I still don’t tire of this song. Shit, maybe I should call it number one.

The last two tracks are strong and solid ones. I sometimes wonder if “I’m Insane” applies to me. After all, I feel that way sometimes. “Scene of the Crime” isn’t the greatest album closer in history but it is probably the best song to close the album, especially with the intro.

Track Listing:

  1. Wanted Man
  2. You’re In Trouble
  3. Round and Round
  4. In Your Direction
  5. She Wants Money
  6. Lack of Communication
  7. Back for More
  8. The Morning After
  9. I’m Insane
  10. Scene of the Crime

Ratt

Stephen Pearcy- vocals

Warren De Martini- guitar, backing vocals

Robbin Crosby- guitar, backing vocals

Juan Crocier- bass, backing vocals

Bobby Blotzer- drums, percussion

When people talk of the metal explosion of 1984, Ratt always gets a mention. Though many would accuse them of being too much the same on later albums, there is no debate that “Out of the Cellar” album was something fresh, at least to me.

Next post: Twisted Sister- Stay Hungry

To get Rock and Roll Children, go to: https://spread-luv.ga/info/kindle-free-e-books-rock-and-roll-children-by-michael-d-lefevre-9781609763558-pdf.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Metal Albums of 1982: Riot- Restless Breed

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 30, 2015 by 80smetalman

RIOT_RB

Having reread my post for the previous Riot album, “Fire Down Under,” I realise that I did post a picture of RATT when I meant to post a picture of the band Riot. Therefore, I have come to the executive decision that I will no longer use google images when I post pictures of albums or bands. Instead, I will use the heavyharmonies.com site which actually takes getting its facts right seriously. Enough of that now, let’s get to another great album from Riot that I should not have waited til the late 80s to listen to.

Again, after listening to the 1982 offering from Riot, “Restless Breed,” I am again asking why this band didn’t have more commercial success. As I listened to the album, I could hear songs that, in my mind, influenced some of the bands that came after and had more success. For instance, the track “C.I.A.” sounds like something that WASP would have done and “When I Was Young” reminds me a little of Y & T. However, Riot was around long before either of these bands were so they drew influence from Riot. Saying that, I could hear a little Judas Priest influence in “When I was Young” as well. However, the rest of the album is straight ahead no frills heavy metal, the way heavy metal was supposed to be played.

“Hard Lovin’ Man” may not be the greatest song in the world to open an album but it does the job in preparing the way for the rest of the album. It may have influenced WASP but “C.I.A.” is still a brilliant song and the next one “Restless Breed” is even better. The middle of the order on the album is for me, the strongest. The songs “When I Was Young,” “Loanshark” and “Loved by You” are the stand outs for me. The latter has one of those catchy choruses where you are still singing it long after the album has finished and you are three miles down the road in the car. They are just loveable rockers. And the best guitar solo goes to the next track, “Over to You.” “Slow Down” is the token ballad on the album but it’s not bad with some good guitar work on it. Things return to normal with the last two songs. “Dream Away” sounds like it might be another ballad but don’t let the title fool you. It has that Southern rock boogie vibe to it and the closer, “Violent Crimes” ends things very nicely. All in all, “Restless Breed” by Riot is one I should have had on cassette blasting out of the car as I cruised down the road.

Track Listing:

  1. Hard Lovin’ Man
  2. C.I.A.
  3. Restless Breed
  4. When I was Young
  5. Loanshark
  6. Loved By You
  7. Over to You
  8. Slow Down
  9. Dream Away
  10. Violent Crimes
Riot (and this time it actually is them)

Riot (and this time it actually is them)

Rhett Forester- vocals, harmonica

Mark Reale- guitar

Rick Ventura- guitar

Kip Leming- bass

Sandy Slavin- drums

Let me venture a theory on why Riot didn’t get the notoriety they so richly deserved back in the day. I think that people were so caught up in the new wave of British heavy metal (NWOBHM) that possibly American metal bands got pushed to one side. Whatever, the case, Riot was a band who rocked and those who were fortunate to listen to them can vouch for it.

Next post: Y & T- Black Tiger

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London