Archive for Riot

Great Metal Albums of 1983: Riot- Born in America

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2016 by 80smetalman

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Looking back, I had heard of Riot about the same time as I did Hanoi Rocks. The difference being that I never saw Riot live and therefore it would be several more years before I actually listened to anything from them. I do feel like I missed something there. I have already reviewed two of their previous offerings, “Fire Down Under” and “Restless Breed,” both of which were damn good albums. Now that I have listened to their 1983 album, “Born in America,” I can say that album too is just as good.

“Born in America” is another straightforward, in your face metal album from Riot. There are no frills, just great songs. The first two set the album off in totally the right direction. Things appear to slow down with “Wings of Fire.” The song suckers you into believing it’s a ballad for the first minute then Kapow! The song goes into another metal frenzy. (Note: I was going to say ‘Wham’ but that word shouldn’t be used on any 80smetalman post.) I love the guitar solo on “Running From the Law,” another good song.

Next comes “Devil Woman” and yes, it’s a cover of the Cliff Richard single. Admitting my sad teenage years, I liked Cliff’s version when I heard it in 1976. Back then, that was probably the hardest song on AM radio. Riot takes the song and raises it to its full potential. Great power chords with some cool guitar soloing and Rhett Forester’s voice sounds a hell of a lot better on this song than Cliff Richard, sorry Cliff.

In spite of my high praise for “Devil Woman,” it is not the high point of “Born in America.” It’s simply the climax. All of the songs that follow are superb starting with my favourite, “Vigilante Killer.” The ones that follow on are just as good. All have the trademarks of what makes good heavy metal but it would be unfair to the songs if I were to mention any one of them without mentioning the others. They’re all that good and that makes the album fantastic.

Track Listing:

  1. Born in America
  2. You Burn in Me
  3. Wings of Fire
  4. Running From the Law
  5. Devil Woman
  6. Vigilante Killer
  7. Heavy Metal Machine
  8. Where Soldiers Rule
  9. Gunfighter
  10. Promised Land
Riot

Riot

Rhett Forester- vocals

Mark Reale- guitars

Rick Ventura- guitars

Kip Leming- bass

Sandy Slavin- drums

“Born in America” would mark the end of Riot as it was known here. All except Mark Reale would leave the band leaving him to eventually recruit other names for the band. But that wouldn’t happen for another five years in heavy metal history. Forrester would have some solo success but again, that’s a story for later. Since “Born in America” was such a cool album, it can be safely said that Riot definitely went out on a high with it.

Next post: Bernie Torme and the Electric Gypsies

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.80smetalman.wordpress.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes And Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Great Metal Albums of 1982: Ted Nugent- Nugent

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2015 by 80smetalman

NUGENTTED_N

New Wave of British Heavy Metal or NWOBHM had clearly established its dominance around the world in 1982. However, thanks to bands like Riot and Y&T as well as others whose albums will be visited very soon, American metal wasn’t completely silent . Of all the American bands, the one artist who draped himself (and still does) in the American flag was Ted Nugent. In this year, the Motor City Madman put out a studio album and a live one. It is the studio album, “Nugent” that is being visited today.

Another reason why I’ve decided to visit the studio album first was that because of my military obligations, it was another album that passed me by in that year. Yet again, it’s another album I regret missing in 1982. “Nugent” has all the classic trademarks of the things that made Ted Nugent great. Most noteworthy, as is always the case with Ted, is the fact that he can wail on a guitar. His solos are present on each and every song, though the stand out for me is “Good and Ready.” “No, No, No” also comes to mind in this respect.

Apart from his exemplary guitar work, he does write some good songs. It is true that “Bound and Gagged” may be the first inclination of Ted’s feelings of fanatical American patriotism and right wing politics but I know I wouldn’t have noticed or cared back then. It’s still a cool song. That’s one problem with listening to the song with, in this case, the curse of hindsight. I also found myself wanting to sing along to “Fightin’ Words.” “Ebony” might be classed as his attempt at a single but I never heard it on the radio, not that you ever heard much of his material there to begin with. Nevertheless, it’s a decent song.

“Don’t Push Me” is short and to the point and definitely one I would have used to blast out the car window while driving. Note to self, maybe I should make my own CD of driving songs. Anyway back on the subject. The way he lays down the guitar jam while the band is repeating the title works for me in so many ways. If there was one thing I would change on “Nugent” it would be the order of the last two songs. “Tailgunner” is a good song but I thought the one before it “We’re Gonna Rock Tonight” would have been a better closer. It’s just that the lyrics and overall vibe of the song make it a great song to end the album on but that’s just me.

Track Listing:

  1. No, No, No
  2. Bound and Gagged
  3. Habitual Offender
  4. Fightin’ Words
  5. Good and Ready
  6. Ebony
  7. Don’t Push Me
  8. Can’t Stop Me Now
  9. We’re Gonna Rock Tonight
  10. Tailgunner
Ted Nugent

  Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent- lead vocals, lead guitars

Derek St. Holmes- guitar, vocals

Dave Kiswiney- bass, vocals

Carmine Appice- drums, vocals

Larry Brown- percussion

Donnie Backus- piano

Ted Nugent let the world know in 1982 that there was still plenty of good metal in America with his two albums. “Nugent” was one of those and proved that he could still rock with the best of them.

Next post: Manowar- Battle Hyms

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

Great Metal Albums of 1982: Y&T- Black Tiger

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 2, 2015 by 80smetalman

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They say you learn something new everyday and the other day I did. My first experience of Y&T was in 1983 when I saw and heard their video for “Mean Streak” on MTV. I liked the band and I liked the song and that was the start of my experience with them. Now last week I stated that there was a song on the Riot “Restless Breed” album that sounded a little like Y&T. I assumed that since Riot had been around since the 1970s, that Y&T must have drawn influence from them. As I now dig deeper into the band’s history, (not only the album but the band too passed me by in 1982), I have discovered that Y&T’s first album actually came out in 1976, the year before Riot’s first album. So maybe it was the other way around but that doesn’t matter. It was a good song and the 1982 “Black Tiger” album is a good album.

If you heard the 1985 single “Summertime Girls” and think that was Y&T, forget about it. “Black Tiger” is a true metal album. I like the introductory first track “From the Moon.” It is an instrumental with some flashy guitar work that simply draws you into the rest of the album. “Open Fire” is a rip roaring track that holds you interest and Y&T puts their personal stamp on this one. I love the guitar solo on “Don’t Wanna Lose,” Dave Meniketti does smoke the finger board on that one. After your ears get bashed around a bit by the next few tracks, which the track “Forever” stands out the most. This is one of those catchy anthem type songs that you can sing along with. It also opens with a gutsy guitar intro before going almost thrash, wow was all I could say.  Things take a more boogie rock approach with “Barroom Boogie.” This in an enjoyable song and one I would put down as a good drinking tune. Unfortunately, the next song, “My Way or the Highway” is the weakest link here. It has some good moments but seems to let itself down in some places. However, things go out very nicely with the near ballad, “Winds of Change,” a really good song. So with “Black Tiger,” I have found another band where I must go back and listen to some of the early stuff.

Track Listing:

  1. From the Moon
  2. Open Fire
  3. Don’t Wanna Lose
  4. Hell or High Water
  5. Forever
  6. Black Tiger
  7. Barroom Boogie
  8. My Way or the Highway
  9. Winds of Change
Y&T

                                            Y&T

Dave Meniketti- lead guitar, lead vocals

Phil Kennemore- bass, vocals

Joey Alves- guitar

Leonard Haze- drums, percussion

The price I paid for serving my country back in 1982 was that I missed a lot of great albums and some great bands. With Y&T and “Black Tiger,” I missed both at the same time.

Next post: Iron Maiden- Number of the Beast

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

Great Metal Albums of 1982: Riot- Restless Breed

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 30, 2015 by 80smetalman

RIOT_RB

Having reread my post for the previous Riot album, “Fire Down Under,” I realise that I did post a picture of RATT when I meant to post a picture of the band Riot. Therefore, I have come to the executive decision that I will no longer use google images when I post pictures of albums or bands. Instead, I will use the heavyharmonies.com site which actually takes getting its facts right seriously. Enough of that now, let’s get to another great album from Riot that I should not have waited til the late 80s to listen to.

Again, after listening to the 1982 offering from Riot, “Restless Breed,” I am again asking why this band didn’t have more commercial success. As I listened to the album, I could hear songs that, in my mind, influenced some of the bands that came after and had more success. For instance, the track “C.I.A.” sounds like something that WASP would have done and “When I Was Young” reminds me a little of Y & T. However, Riot was around long before either of these bands were so they drew influence from Riot. Saying that, I could hear a little Judas Priest influence in “When I was Young” as well. However, the rest of the album is straight ahead no frills heavy metal, the way heavy metal was supposed to be played.

“Hard Lovin’ Man” may not be the greatest song in the world to open an album but it does the job in preparing the way for the rest of the album. It may have influenced WASP but “C.I.A.” is still a brilliant song and the next one “Restless Breed” is even better. The middle of the order on the album is for me, the strongest. The songs “When I Was Young,” “Loanshark” and “Loved by You” are the stand outs for me. The latter has one of those catchy choruses where you are still singing it long after the album has finished and you are three miles down the road in the car. They are just loveable rockers. And the best guitar solo goes to the next track, “Over to You.” “Slow Down” is the token ballad on the album but it’s not bad with some good guitar work on it. Things return to normal with the last two songs. “Dream Away” sounds like it might be another ballad but don’t let the title fool you. It has that Southern rock boogie vibe to it and the closer, “Violent Crimes” ends things very nicely. All in all, “Restless Breed” by Riot is one I should have had on cassette blasting out of the car as I cruised down the road.

Track Listing:

  1. Hard Lovin’ Man
  2. C.I.A.
  3. Restless Breed
  4. When I was Young
  5. Loanshark
  6. Loved By You
  7. Over to You
  8. Slow Down
  9. Dream Away
  10. Violent Crimes
Riot (and this time it actually is them)

Riot (and this time it actually is them)

Rhett Forester- vocals, harmonica

Mark Reale- guitar

Rick Ventura- guitar

Kip Leming- bass

Sandy Slavin- drums

Let me venture a theory on why Riot didn’t get the notoriety they so richly deserved back in the day. I think that people were so caught up in the new wave of British heavy metal (NWOBHM) that possibly American metal bands got pushed to one side. Whatever, the case, Riot was a band who rocked and those who were fortunate to listen to them can vouch for it.

Next post: Y & T- Black Tiger

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

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Great Metal Albums of 1981: UFO- The Wild, The Willing and The Innocent

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Humour, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 6, 2014 by 80smetalman

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Like Riot, UFO were another band that I should have listened to back in the day but never did. While, Riot were always in my to do tray, UFO almost completely passed me by. I had heard of them but nothing more. It wasn’t until I came to Great Britain in 1986, that I finally listened to them thanks to a friend who had been listening to them for years. More unfortunate was the fact it wasn’t this damn fine 1981 album, “The Wild, The Willing and The Innocent” but due the the year, it was the material they had put out around the time.

Now that I have rectified that mistake, I feel slightly sick that this great album escaped my notice for so so many years. What’s not to like on it? The album starts with a very attention grabbing guitar riff and then blossoms into “Chains Chains,” a song that will be added to my ever growing list of great album opening tracks. “Long Gone” moves the album along very nicely and makes me want to bang my head (against a wall for missing out this album.) While some people may debate whether UFO should be considered “proper metal,” I must bring a little history into the debate. See, back then, even as early as 1981, there were some who were quick to label any music with a hard guitar riff, heavy metal and right or wrongly, UFO were put into the group. True, the next two tracks, I would consider to be more AOR sounding, but not really any less heavy. However, the three tracks after that, do stamp UFO’s heavy sound. I love how “Lonely Heart” where the combined title and intro sucks you in with the belief it’s going to be a ballad before ambushing you with some really heavy sounds and the guitar riffs in “Couldn’t Get it Right” are just sublime. The album finishes with a bit of irony. Any song called “Profession of Violence” would lead me to believe that it would play well to those in a mosh pit. Instead, it’s a very well played bluesy number with some impressive soloing. Well done lads, this album made a believer out of me.

Track Listing:

1. Chains Chains

2. Long Gone

3. The Wild, The Willing and The Innocent

4. It’s Killing Me

5. Making Moves

6. Lonely Heart

7. Couldn’t Get It Right

8. Profession of Violence

UFO

UFO

Phil Mogg- vocals

Paul Chapman- guitars

Neil Carter- keyboards, guitars, saxophone, vocals

Pete Way- bass

Andy Parker- drums

If like me, you let this album slip past you, do like me and listen to it straight away. If you do so on Youtube, you may have to search one track at a time but it’s worth it. “The Wild, The Willing and The Innocent” is a great album.

Next post: Motley Crue- Too Fast For Love

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

Great Metal Albums of 1981: Riot- Full Down Under

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on September 29, 2014 by 80smetalman

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Riot were one band that, all throughout the 80s, I always intended to listen to but never got around to doing so. The opportunity finally came in 1987 when my sister made me a tape of various metal songs on it for my birthday and one of those songs was the great opener, “Swords and Tequila.” That song had and still has the same effect on me that Hanoi Rocks’s “Tragedy” has on me. I want to jump about my living room playing air guitar to it. “Swords and Tequila” has another dimension to it though. The stick in your memory line “Swords and tequila carry me through the night,” had actually meaning for me. Okay, I never had much use for the first item in the title but there were times when the second item did what the rest of what that line says. Oooh, fond memories indeed.

If I had listened to the “Fire Down Under” back in 1981, I would say that it would be the album that set the standard for all future heavy metal. In that sense, it could be argued that Riot were ahead of their time. That could be why they never had the commercial success they should have. There are so many great songs in the classic heavy metal sense that if I were to mention them now, I wouldn’t have to write a track listing but I will say the second half of the album probably just edges out the first. “Don’t Hold Back” is a definite stand out here and I love the guitar solo in it. “Altar of the King” starts with really cool acoustic intro before blowing you ear drums with some great power chords and “No Lies” follows on very very nicely. Saying that, I can’t take anything away from the rest of the album because it’s just that damn good.

Track Listing:

1. Swords and Tequila

2. Fire Down Under

3. Feel the Same

4. Outlaw

5. Don’t Bring Me Down

6. Don’t Hold Back

7. Altar of the King

8. No Lies

9. Run For Your Life

10. Flashbacks

Riot

Riot

Gary Sparenza- vocals

Mark Reale- guitar

Rick Ventura- drums

Kip Leming- bass

Sandy Slavin- drums

After both Hanoi Rocks’s “Tragedy” and “Swords and Tequila” in back to back posts, I find myself contemplating what it would have been like if I had heard both of these songs back in 1981. It would have been mind blowing for sure! Way back when I first introduced 1981, I said that music got me through some rather difficult times that year. It would have been even more up lifting to have had “Fire Down Under” from Riot. If I had heard it back then, I would have declared myself a total metalhead right there and then.

Next post: Triumph- Allied Forces

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

1980: Tragedies and Triumphs- Part 2

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Death, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 7, 2013 by 80smetalman

First of all, I owe a debt of gratitude to KramerTunes for saving me from committing a very fatal error in my first post of Tragedies and Triumphs. How stupid would I have looked if I had gone through 1980 and not mentioned the death of Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham. His death from asphyxiation caused by too much alcohol intake would shock the rock world to its foundations and resulted in the band calling it a day on the grounds they couldn’t continue without him.

John Bonham

John Bonham

Bonham would serve to be a major influence on not only drummers who were around at the time like Joey Krammer, Roger Taylor and Peter Criss, he continues to influence many a rock drummer to this very day. Drummers like Tommy Lee, Dave Lombardo and Dave Grohl all site John Bonham as their biggest influence as well. He created a legacy for rock drummers that will never die and I feel slightly sick that I won’t be going to see Led Zeppelin tribute band Whole Lotta Led when they come to Stroud this Friday night.

don-1980-Cover

 

Now the triumph. In 1980, the first of what was to be a line of great metal festivals took place at Donington Park near Derby in England on August 16 of said year. Rainbow would be the headliners for this mammoth event and supporting were the likes of Judas Priest, The Scorpions,  April Wine, Saxon and Riot. From what I’ve read and heard from people who were at the event, there were a lot of near mishaps including a pyrotechnics explosion the night before. Plus the rainfall on the previous days cause a quagmire on the actual day. Still, as can be expected, metal won the day and it turned out to be the start of a legacy that would go on for over a decade. (Although it can be argued that it still goes on under the name of Download.)

 

Shot of the first Donington

Shot of the first Donington

If you want to read more about this historic event, click this link:

http://www.ukrockfestivals.com/donington-1980.html

Many years have their own triumphs and tragedies and in 1980, the rock/metal world had more than its share. Especially as one more was yet to happen. Still, we can reflect back to the good times and raise a glass to those who left us.

R.IP. John Bonham

Next Post: Thin Lizzy- Chinatown

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London