Archive for South Park

Great Rock Albums of 1983: Bryan Adams- Cuts Like a Knife

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2016 by 80smetalman

Bryan_Adams_Cuts_la_Knife

For this one, anyone under the age of 30 has to forget anything they heard from or about Bryan Adams in the 1990s. Yes, I’m in the camp that believes the song “Everything I Do, I Do It For You” is an embarrassment to hard rock and metal, even if it did stay number one in the UK charts for sixteen weeks. Now my ex wife may point out that I liked the song at the time. Well that was because at the time, I thought it was a great poke in the eye at what was in the UK charts at the time. All that massed produced Stock, Aikman and Waterman crap and techno which always seemed to be around at the time. It was great that a rock song could take the number one slot and stay as long as it did. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it.

Let’s forget about the 90s as it’s the 80s I’m here to talk about. Back in 1983, Bryan Adams was a fresh faced kid who put out a decent album with some good songs on it. I think the best way to describe the album “Cuts Like a Knife” is to use the term ‘innocent.’ There is no attempt to go in any commercial or non-commercial direction with it. I like the think that Bryan was just out to make a record here and what happens, well it happens.

There are several ballads/power ballads on “Cuts Like a Knife.” In fact, it was the title cut I first heard on radio from him. It’s not a bad song but it doesn’t quite measure up to the bar for power ballads set by Bryan’s countrymen two years earlier. However, I do like the guitar solo in it. “Straight From the Heart” is another one as is “I’m Ready” but he’s honest about them. Some rock/metal artists put out ballads but downplay them. There are some decent rockers on here too. “This Time” reeks of commercial, single material but it’s okay. “Take Me Back,” “What’s It Gonna Be” and “Don’t Leave Me Lonely” are better ones and my pick for favourite tracks. Well, Eric Carr from KISS fame did co write “Don’t Leave Me Lonely.”

Track Listing:

  1. The Only One
  2. Take Me Back
  3. This Time
  4. Straight From the Heart
  5. Cuts Like a Knife
  6. I’m Ready
  7. What’s It Gonna Be
  8. Don’t Leave Me Lonely
  9. Let Him Know
  10. The Best Was Yet To Come
Bryan Adams

Bryan Adams

Bryan Adams- lead vocals, guitar, piano on “Straight From the Heart”

Mickey Curry- drums

Tommy Mandel- organ, synthesizer, piano

Keith Scott- guitar, backing vocals

Dave Taylor- bass, backing vocals

In the South Park Movie, there is a line about the Canadian government apologising for Bryan Adams. Whoever came up with that must not have heard this album. There is nothing to apologise for with “Cuts Like a Knife.”

Next post: U2- War

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

 

 

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Great Rock Albums of 1983: DNA- Party Tested

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, video games with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 16, 2015 by 80smetalman

dnapartytested

We all have songs and albums that we listened to many years ago which still pop up in our minds after all these years. For me, when I began to reflect back to the music of 1983, there was one such band that immediately came to mind. I remember DNA getting plenty of air play in the spring of said year although it was only when I refamiliarised myself with them that I remembered the song in question was “Doctors of the Universe.” Now, this could have qualified them as one hit wonders but I did hear the album “Party Tested” once upon a time and remember liking it. Why I never bought it is something I can not understand. Besides any album made by guitar great Rick Derringer and drumming ace Carmine Appice has to be worth, not only a listen but a post on its own.

Let me tell you that listening to “Doctors of the Universe” after more than thirty years did get me in a party mood. I forgot just how catchy that song was then and now. It starts with a hard guitar riff then comes the hook of the keyboards. They sound clean without going totally synth pop, which was the bucking trend at the time. Then there’s the chorus which you want to sing again and again.

“We are the doctors of the universe, we twist your DNA we like our work”

Needless to say, the guitar solo by Rick, while not a belter, is sufficient for this song.

Listening to the rest of “Party Tested” is like seeing an old friend whom you haven’t seen in years. The old familiarites come back instantly. Most of the songs gave me the distinct impression of “Oh yeah, I remember this one.” That is especially the case of the following track, “Intellectual Freedom for the Masses.” But even more so with track three, “Rock and Roll, Part 2.” I definitely heard that one before and fairly recently. It took me a few minutes of laying nude in the grass in deep contemplation, okay maybe not the nudity in the grass, too cold for that but I do remember where I heard it. It was from an episode of South Park where the new kid brings dance to the school. However, he would rather play basketball but his father makes him dance and bitch slaps anyone who opposes him. They play “Rock and Roll Part 2” at the basketball game at the end to which the father gets up and gets into the song. Of course, that song could have that effect on people.

The bitch-slapping dancing father

The bitch-slapping dancing father

Track four, “The Song That Wrote Itself” is the first noticeable one where Rick Derringer shows why he should be counted among the guitar greats. He really jams out here and while his guitar presence isn’t as in your face as the mentioned song, it is enough to hook you. The title track is definitely one for that and I have to say that “What About?” is a better than decent closer. One thing I must point out is that if you’re expecting major drum solos from Carmine, there are none to be had on “Party Tested.” He doesn’t need to as his drumming is as good as ever on the album. In fact, I will venture forth the opinion that he and bassist Jimmy Johnson make a damn fine rhythm section.

Track Listing:

  1. Doctors of the Universe
  2. Intellectual Freedom for the Masses
  3. Rock And Roll Part 2
  4. The Song That Wrote Itself
  5. Party Tested
  6. The Recipe For Life
  7. What About?
Rick Derringer and Carmine Appice

Rick Derringer and Carmine Appice

Carmine Appice- drums, vocals

Rick Derringer- guitar, vocals

Jimmy Johnson- bass

Duane Hitchings- keyboards

I am hoping that when people read about this album, they respond with, “Oh yes, I remember them, that song/album” but I fear that it might draw a blank. Therefore, your assignment should be to have a listen to “Party Tested.” It will get you in the party mood and what a better way to do that in the run up to the holiday season.

Next post: Christmas

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

 

Great Rock Albums of 1981: Stevie Nicks- Bella Donna

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, television, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2014 by 80smetalman

220px-Bella_Donna_(album)

Stevie Nicks has one thing in common with George Harrison in a sense. I have already mentioned that George’s solo material his my favourite among The Beatles. Likewise, of the solo productions from the members of Fleetwood Mac, it is Stevie Nicks’s material that comes out number one for me. I have heard all of the comments about her having a voice like a sheep. In fact, I enjoyed South Park’s little parody about that. The thing is that I don’t care whether or not she sounds like a sheep, I like her voice and the music that accompanies it. The album “Bella Donna” being one of them.

snonsp

Thinking back to when the songs of this album were played on commercial radio, I am reminded why I don’t like it very much. Back in 1981, the two songs that seemed to get all of the air play were the two duets that appear on the album. One was done with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, okay not really a duet, but “Stop Dragging My Heart Around is a decent song. So is the other duet she performs with former Eagles drummer Don Henley, the mellower “Leather and Lace.” I heard this song played on radio several months back and at its conclusion, the deejay only attributed the song to Stevie Nicks. It made me quite cross the Henley didn’t get a mention in the credits, especially as it was a classic rock station and have played Eagles songs in the past. Okay, rant over.

The point I was wanting to make pre-rant was that while the two mentioned songs are decent and so are the other tracks on the album, one song stands head and shoulders above the rest. It is “Edge of Seventeen” that has me banging my head every time I hear it and that is quite often as it’s on one of my MP3s. For Stevie, this is a great rock tune and shows that she can sing rock with the best of them. It is also a song that I would love to hear covered by a metal band.

Track Listing:

1. Bella Donna

2. Kind of Woman

3. Stop Dragging My Heart Around

4. Think About It

5. After the Glitter Fades

6. Edge of Seventeen

7. How Still My Love

8. Leather and Lace

9. Outside the Rain

10. The Highway Man

Stevie Nicks

Stevie Nicks

Stevie Nicks- lead vocals

Lori Perry- backing vocals

Sharon Celani- backing vocals

Tom Petty- guitar, accompanying vocals (Track 3)

Michael Campbell- guitar

Don Felder- guitar

Benmont Trench- piano, organ, backing vocals

Stan Lynch- drums

Don Henley- drums, accompanying vocals (Track 8)

Fleetwood Mac may have been on a hiatus in 1981 but Stevie Nicks was tearing up the rock world with this great album. She showed that she was perfectly capable of making it on her own. Even if some people think she sounds like a sheep.

Next post: A New TV Station is Born

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and at Foyles Book Shop in London