Archive for Turbo

Great Metal Albums of 1987: Judas Priest- Priest…Live

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2022 by 80smetalman

Damn my Swiss cheese memory! A few years back, I posted my top 15 live albums and for some reason, “Live…Priest” wasn’t on said list. This is particularly shameful as I have seen the mighty Judas Priest live three times and I know how good they are in concert. This live album totally catches the essence of this legendary band.

“Live…Priest” was recorded live in Atlanta, Georgia the previous year when Judas Priest were touring for their “Turbo” album. However, many songs from their previous albums are represented too and only three songs from “Turbo.” For those who had disliked that album, this wasn’t a bad thing. Of course, they play “Turbo Lover” but they also play the more metalized “Parental Guidance” and they knock that one out of the park. The third track is “Private Property” and again, it sounds a hell of a lot better when played live that it did on the album. It helped that the crowd was singing the chorus along to Rob. Then again, you can count on Priest to nail any song live.

Needless to say, all of the best known Judas Priest songs of the time appear on the live album but they do sound so much better. “Breaking the Law,” one they always play live comes in as the fourth track and it’s well placed after “Metal Gods.” Another boring point in the life of 80smetalman is when I saw them live in 1986, I don’t remember them playing “Love Bites.” They more than make up for it here! And of course, they play my second favourite JP song of all time, “Some Heads are Gonna Roll.” By the time this song comes around, I am wanting to break out the cigarette lighter and hold it high.

Now I could go on with the remainder of the songs on the album but they are all classics which any Judas Priest fan, casual or hardcore, will know anyway. Let’s talk about the band’s performance instead. The album sounds like Judas Priest were on fire that night and they had the Atlanta crowd eating out of their hands. Robert Halford’s vocals sound fresh all through the album and he shows what a great frontman he has always been. Of course, Glenn and KK weald their axes with precision and there are some great guitar solo trade-offs between the pair. So many, I can’t choose a favourite. Dave Holland provides some brilliant drumming as well but in regards to Judas Priest, I don’t think Ian Hill gets the accolades he so richly deserves. When I saw them, he stood at the back and I was glad when I saw them again in 2009, he was allowed to join the others at the front. On this live album, I can hear his bass plugging along, providing that crucial rhythm the band depends on.

Track Listing:

  1. Out in the Cold
  2. Heading Out on the Highway
  3. Metal Gods
  4. Breaking the Law
  5. Love Bites
  6. Some Heads are Gonna Roll
  7. The Sentinel
  8. Private Property
  9. Rock You All Around the World
  10. Electric Eye
  11. Turbo Lover
  12. Freewheel Burning
  13. Parental Guidance
  14. Livin’ After Midnight
  15. You Got Another Thing Comin’
Judas Priest

Rob Halford- vocals

Glenn Tipton- guitar

KK Downing- guitar

Ian Hill- bass

Dave Holland- drums

Honestly, did you expect anything less from a live Judas Priest album? I can’t believe how much I ignored this album for so many years. I’m rectifying that now.

Next post: In memory of Meatloaf’s passing. Meatloaf- Live at Wembley

To buy Rock and Roll Children, email me at: tobychainsaw@hotmail.com

Great Metal Albums of 1981: Judas Priest- Point of Entry

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 14, 2014 by 80smetalman

220px-Judas_priest_-_point_of_entry_a

You probably have already noticed that I didn’t go to Bloodstock this year and it wasn’t because of all the rain. While I would have loved to have seen Megadeath and Saxon on stage, my finances are dictated by other priorities, mainly my trip to the US in October. Enough of that said, onto the “Point of Entry,” the 1981 album from metal gods Judas Priest.

Many people have shot down “Point of Entry” over the years and I ask myself if this is fair. One such person even put the album on a par with “Turbo” and to me, that is totally way off base. I will be the first to admit, it is not one of Judas Priest’s best albums. What highlights this the most is that it is unfortunately sandwiched between what I think is their two best albums of all time: “British Steel” and “Screaming for Vengeance.” I think that most of the other albums would pale significantly when put between those two monuments to metal. Taking them out of the equation and listening to “Point of Entry” on its own, I can safely say that it doesn’t totally suck.

“Heading Out on the Highway” is an adequate opener and “Don’t Go” does move the party along to the one of the more stronger tracks, “Hot Rockin’.” But I’m not too sure about “Turning Circles” and “Desert Plains,” maybe another listen is due here. However, the most of the remainder of the album is quite good. I do like the guitars in  “Solar Angels” and “You Say Yes” would be a great song to sing along to when drinking heavily. I’m going to have to try it just to make sure. “All the Way” and “Troubleshooter” are decent songs too but I’m not too sure about the closer. A good closing song should make me feel uplifted and I can’t say that “On the Run” does that. Overall though, I think “Point of Entry” is a good album from Judas Priest and there are some of the famous trademark screams from Halford and the solid guitar work of Tipton and Downing. Maybe after the likes of the albums that precede and succeed it, the bar may have been set too high.

Track Listing:

1. Heading Out on the Highway

2. Don’t Go

3. Hot Rockin’

4. Turning Circles

5. Desert Plains

6. Solar Angels

7. You Say Yes

8. All the Way

9. Troubleshooter

10. On the Run

Judas Priest

Judas Priest

Rob Halford- vocals

Glen Tipton- guitar

KK Downing- guitar

Ian Hill- bass

Dave Holland- drums

 “Point of Entry” isn’t the terrible album made out to be. If I were grading it I might be tempted to say it wasn’t done at the best of the band’s ability and it doesn’t stand out from many of the great metal albums that came out in 1981, but it’s still good enough to be included among them.

Next post: Saxon- Denim and Leather, out of respect of not going to Bloodstock

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