Archive for Ted Nugent

Great Metal Albums of 1985: Metal For Breakfast

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2018 by 80smetalman

Welcome to the first heavy metal compilation album I bought. It was early February 1985 when I saw “Metal For Breakfast” at my local record store. Since I often used to feel like the way the dude on the cover looks, I thought it was worth a look. When I flipped to the back cover of the album and saw who was actually on it and their songs, I knew I had to buy it straight away. Who couldn’t resist an album with Ted Nugent, Saxon, Y&T, Quiet Riot, Ozzy and Judas Priest on it. Furthermore, the songs from these artists with the exception of Judas Priest’s hidden gem, (I had never heard “The Ripper” until this album), was more incentive to get it. But that’s only half the story!

Attic Records, being based in Toronto, seemed very eager to unveil much of its local talent and they chose a good group to do so. I had heard of Anvil but never listened to them. “Forged in Fire” changed all that. Any band called The Killer Dwarfs had to be granted a listen and “Heavy Mental Breakdown” did not disappoint. This was the first step on their way to them becoming my all time favourite Canadian band. I know Mercyful Fate are from Denmark but the fact that “Black Funeral” comes right out and sings “Hail Satan” sticks one in the ear for the American religious zealots. On the second side is the lovely Lee Aaron and “Metal Queen” is mind blowing. Of course, there’s always a hidden gem and on “Metal For Breakfast” it’s the track “Metalhead” by Blotto. It takes a dig at metalheads but it’s done in a really funny way plus, it’s a good song. So what you have is a great combination of well known metal tunes and ones that weren’t so well known coming together to make a fantastic album.

Track Listing:

1. Anvil- Forged in Fire

2. Ted Nugent- Cat Scratch Fever

3. Killer Dwarfs- Heavy Mental Breakdown

4. Accept- Balls to the Wall

5. Mercyful Fate- Black Funeral

6. Blotto- Metalhead

7. Lee Aaron- Metal Queen

8. Saxon- Princess of the Night

9. Judas Priest- The Ripper

10. Quiet Riot- Metal Health

11. Y&T- Mean Streak

12. Ozzy Osbourne- Crazy Train

And I think you should listen to the hidden gem:

Back in 1985, “Metal for Breakfast” was the classic metal combination of what was known and not so known in the heavy metal world. Nowadays, it’s just a classic 80s album but it still kicks ass!

I probably looked more like this back then.

Next post: Dokken- Tooth ‘N’ Nail

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Great Metal Albums of 1984: Ted Nugent- Penetrator

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 29, 2017 by 80smetalman

Guess what? For this Ted Nugent post, I’m not going to say anything about his politics. Even I know when to stop beating a dead horse. So instead, I’ll focus on his 1984 album, “Penetrator,” which was universally criticized by the metal world for his use of keyboards on the album. To my shame, even I was one of those critics. Thankfully, there’s a much older and questionably wiser me to listen to the album with a more objective mind. My thoughts: “Penetrator” still doesn’t make me want to put albums like “Cat Scratch Fever,” “Weekend Warriors” and “Scream Dream” nor any of his kick ass live albums on the scrap heap but it’s still a pretty good album.

The use of keyboards come through straight away on the opening song, “Tied Up In Love” but not until after a really cool guitar intro only which Terrible Ted can do. Before, I risk repeating myself over and over, the keyboards do make their presence known on many of the songs but they play a subordinate role on the album. Take the second song for example, “(Where Do You) Draw the Line.” This song was written by Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance so one might be forgiven for thinking this was going to be some keyboard dominated soft rock song, it’s not. Ted’s guitar magic comes through very loud and abundantly clear. While still present, the keyboards take even more of a back seat on “Knocking at Your Door.” There are some good guitar riffs to lead the song and Ted nails the guitar solo perfectly. Even more so on the track after “Don’t You Want My Love.” Here the keys are almost non existent. Almost, but there are plenty of Nugent style rocking to be heard on it.

A curious twist comes up with “Go Down Fighting.” This is a song title that you would expect to be a belt it out of the park rocker but the keyboards make their presence known on it, almost making it a Journey type song. The strange thing is that the intro reminds me of Savatage, yeah really. Fortunately, Ted works his guitar magic so you know which side of the fence the song really is. Any doubts of that are dispelled with “Thunder Thighs.” This is a great rocker where Ted just takes control and jams and I hear not one trace of keyboards. It’s just Ted being how he always had been in albums past. However, I sometimes am reluctant to declare it my favourite song on the album because of the sexist connotations behind the title. “No Man’s Land” is just as heavy, if not more than it’s predecessor. Where you think there might be a keyboard at the chorus, there isn’t. After a couple of decent but non descriptive tracks is the closer “Take Me Home.” Again, maybe it’s me but this sounds like a Southern Rock anthem. Not something I’d expect from Ted Nugent but it’s the best song for the closer.

Looking at the credits and remembering recent posts, it turns out that Bobby Chouinard’s drum skills were in great demand in 1984. He played on some of the tracks of both Gary Moore albums I recently posted about and he plays on this entire album. It leads me to conclude that his skills have been forgotten about in later years and this is a travesty because, he’s that good.

Track Listing:

  1. Tied Up In Love
  2. (Where Do You) Draw the Line
  3. Knockin’ At Your Door
  4. Don’t You Want My Love
  5. Go Down Fighting
  6. Thunder Thighs
  7. No Man’s Land
  8. Blame it On the Night
  9. Lean Mean R&R Machine
  10. Take Me Home

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent_ guitars, lead vocals

Brian Howe- lead vocals

Alan St John- keyboards- vocals

Doug Lubahn-bass

Bobby Chouinard- drums

Two interesting notes regarding Ted Nugent, the first coming from this post. Two years on, I would see Ted Nugent live with Savatage in support. It was a great concert even if it was poorly attended. The other was after my last Ted Nugent post, I put him down on the Bloodstock wishlist. The only comment I got back was someone saying they would love for him to play Bloodstock but he has only come to the UK four times since 1988. Anyway, back to “Penetrator.” This album was far better than I remembered it back in 1984, keyboards or not.

Next post: Great White

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A New Great Metal Album: Greywind- Afterthoughts

Posted in Concerts, Heavy Metal, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 5, 2017 by 80smetalman

Apologies for all of those who were expecting to be reading my thoughts on the “Fugazi” album from Marillion. Trust me, that will be coming very soon. What has thrown a metal spanner in the works was my getting and listening to the debut album, “Afterthoughts” by Greywind after seeing them dominate the Avalanche Stage on the Saturday and Download. Now, that I’ve had a couple of listens to it, I am even more impressed and now want to spread the word about this band.

Greywind making their mark at Download

At first listen, one might be tempted to compare Greywind to Paramore and there are similarities in the sound beyond the fact that both are fronted by female lead singers. Only similarities though, as I find Greywind to be much more in your face than what Paramore ever was, no disrespect to that band. There is some powerful forces at work on “Afterthoughts” in between some flashes of prog metal. The best example of this is on the tracks “Circle” and “The Lake.” The latter uses a piano in a very seductive way that lures you into a possible mellow out before belting you ear drums with more guitars. However, those aren’t my favourite tracks on the album. The title track is a definite candidate as well as being a great opener for the album. I also like the track “Desolate” for its start like a ballad before ripping your head off power chords and then going back and forth between the two and “Car Spins” is a very interesting track to say indeed.

One thing I learned after purchasing the album was that Greywind are actually a brother and sister act fronted by guitarist Paul O’Sullivan and singer Stephanie O’Sullivan. The rhythm section get a mention in the Special Thanks part on the label as they should. Mark Chapman and Adam Perry make a very good one here. Guitarist Paul is a very good guitarist which is paradoxical for me. I usually like ones who do blistering solos ala Van Halen, Nugent, Blackmore, Iommi, Page etc. I had to stop there before I got carried away naming all the great axemen. He does play some intricate little riffs throughout the songs that don’t escape your attention.

For me though, it’s the dominating voice of Steph that makes this album for me. In comparison to Paramore, Hayley Williams’ vocals don’t even come close! Steph O’Sullivan can do it all. She can sing soft or belt you with her raw power vocal chords. She did that at Download and she does it here on the album.

Track Listing:

  1. Afterthoughts
  2. Forest Ablaze
  3. Circle
  4. Safe Haven
  5. The Lake
  6. Car Spin
  7. Stitch On My Wings
  8. Desolate
  9. In Autumn
  10. Wander

Stephanie O’Sullivan giving it her all.

Stephanie O’Sullivan- vocals

Paul O’Sullivan- guitars

Mark Chapman- bass

Adam Perry- drums

The whole point of my writing “Rock and Roll Children” and starting 80sMetalman was to get everyone to get out their old albums and listen to them again. I know a lot of you never stopped listening to them. In this case, I’m hoping that you will give a new band a chance and listen to their debut album because I think it’s worth it.

To buy Rock And Roll Children go to: https://www.amazon.com/Rock-Roll-Children-Michael-Lefevre/dp/1609763556/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1499276423&sr=8-8&keywords=michael+d+lefevre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Rock Albums of 1983: Stray Cats- Built For Speed

Posted in 1980s, Music, Rock, television, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 24, 2016 by 80smetalman

220px-Built_For_Speed_cover

Internet didn’t exist back in 1983 and that is going to be my excuse for posting an album that came out in the middle of 1982 in 1983. A quick historical point here, it was the early 1980s when computer technology was becoming accessible to the common masses. I did do an introductory course in computers during my first semester at college in the Autumn of this year but that’s not important here. What is was the fact that back then, I had to rely on record stores, radio, word of mouth and a late night television show called “Video Rock” to learn about new music. Our house didn’t even get MTV until the December of this year! It was the mentioned television show where I first learned about the Stray Cats in the summer of 1983.

It was their 1950s look and sound that first got my attention. At a time where everyone was trying to be different, the Stray Cats actually were. While I wasn’t very impressed with the first single I heard, “Stray Cats Strut,” I did like the second one that reached my ears, “Rock This Town.” Even though, like most people, I got the impression they were in love with the fifties, I thought they were at least trying to be original at the time. Besides, with “Rock This Town,” they proved to me they were good musicians. Brian Setzer was a competent guitarist, (no Van Halen or Nugent but competent) and Slim Jim Phantom and Lee Rocker work very well together as a rhythm section, a point I will certainly expand on when I get to 1985.

The Stray Cats’ album “Built For Speed,” pretty much sounds like the two songs I’ve already mentioned. They are firmly locked in the 1950s rockabilly sound reminiscent of Eddie Cochran or Bill Haley and the Comets, not a bad thing. Each song, with the exception of the slower “Lonely Summer Nights” possesses a catchy sound that draws you in. It might not get you to start fist pumping and banging your head but I did find myself wanting to snap my fingers along with them, which is saying something for someone with no natural rhythm. Apart from “Rock This Town,” the other songs which stand out for me are “Little Miss Prissy,” “Rumble in Brighton” and “Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie.” All contain a strong dose of the elements that turned my ear to the Stray Cats in the first place. Not only was it something different at the time, what was different was done very well.

Track Listing:

  1. Rock This Town
  2. Built for Speed
  3. Rev It Up & Go
  4. Stray Cats Strut
  5. Little Miss Prissy
  6. Rumble in Brighton
  7. Runaway Boys
  8. Lonely Summer Nights
  9. Double Talkin’ Baby
  10. You Don’t Believe Me
  11. Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie
  12. Baby Blue Eyes
Stray Cats

Stray Cats

Brian Setzer- vocals, guitar

Slim Jim Phantom- drums, percussion, vocals

Lee Rocker- double bass, bass, vocals

Outside of this album, I have little experience of the Stray Cats. For me, their 1950s persona would only last for the one album. Their next album would pretty much escape my notice and in the years following, it would be their post break up projects that I would be more into. Saying all this, however, doesn’t stop “Built For Speed” from being a pretty good album.

Next post: Michael Stanley Band- You Can’t Fight Fashion

To Buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

Great Metal Albums of 1982: Saxon- The Eagle Has Landed

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2015 by 80smetalman

220px-Eaglelandedsaxon

One of the things I should have realised, but didn’t, is that there were some killer live albums in 1982. Three of them, Black Sabbath- “Live Evil,” Michael Schenker Group- “One Night at Budokan” and Blue Oyster Cult- “Extra Terrestrial Live,” I bought not long after they had come out. The fourth, Ted Nugent- “Intensity in 10 Cities” would escape my knowledge for a long while. That’s the problem when you are in the military and spend most of the year deployed overseas. It creates a Swiss cheese effect on things like musical releases from bands you might follow. This caused me to completely miss a fifth great live album and one that definitely stands shoulder to shoulder with the ones I’ve already listed. That is Saxon- “The Eagle Has Landed.”

Having seen Saxon live before I got to listen to “The Eagle Has Landed,” I had a very strong inclination that this was going to be an excellent live album. I was right. It has all of the classic Saxon songs at the time with the bonus touch of being played so well live. I thought it was only natural that they used the great song “Wheels of Steel” for the audience participation part of the show. After all, that song is one of their best known songs.

The added bonus for me was that the album was recorded while Saxon were on tour for my favourite album of theirs, “Denim and Leather.” “Princess of the Night” has its much deserved place on the album and is played brilliantly on it. Here is my personal slight disappointment about that. Other than “Princess,” the other two songs, “Never Surrender” and “Fire In the Sky” wouldn’t have been my first choices from “Denim and Leather” to use on the live album. Don’t get me wrong, they are both cool songs but why the hell wasn’t the title track on it? After all, “Denim and Leather” is a metal anthem that rings true throughout the metal generations! I thought it was only right that it be on the live album. Another song I would have used would have been “Play it Loud,” almost for the same reason. Saying that, “And the Band Played On” and “Midnight Rider” appear on the 2005 remaster. But enough of me nit picking, there are so many great songs on “The Eagle Has Landed” that it makes it a guaranteed good listen.

Track Listing:

  1. Motorcycle Man
  2. 747 Strangers in the Night
  3. Princess of the Night
  4. Strong Arm of the Law
  5. Heavy Metal Thunder
  6. 20,000 Feet
  7. Wheels of Steel
  8. Never Surrender
  9. Fire in the Sky
  10. Machine Gun
Saxon

Saxon

Biff Byford- vocals

Graham Oliver- guitar

Paul Quinn- guitar

Steve Dawson- bass

Nigel Glockler- drums

Like I said, there were many great live albums in 1982. Saxon’s contribution “The Eagle Has Landed” definitely belongs along side of the other great ones from that year.

Next post: Twisted Sister- Under the Blade

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Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

Ted Nugent- Intensity in 10 Cities

Posted in 1980s, Concerts, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2015 by 80smetalman

220px-Intensities_in_10_Cities

Someone once called me “clueless” because I stated that I would still go to a Ted Nugent concert in spite of his political ramblings. What do they know? What I know is that when you see the Motor City Madman on stage, you don’t care about politics, you are simply amazed by the energy Ted emits while on stage and the magic he creates with that guitar. Having seen him live twice and both accounts are recorded for posterity in “Rock and Roll Children,” I can personally testify to this.

wayensworld

“You’re Double Live Gonzo, Live at Budokan, Intensity in 10 Cities.” Wayne Campbell to Casandra in Wayne’s World 1

I have heard many a live album in my years and I can say that no one else brings the energy from a live show onto a record better than Ted Nugent. This is just as much true with the 1982 live album “Intensity in 10 Cities” as it was with the 1978 “Double Live Gonzo.” The songs recorded on the album were a series of songs that were never recorded previously. Ted believed that since those songs had been well honed over the months of playing them on tour, they would sound better recorded live as opposed to in the studio. I have to say, I think he was right on that one.

If “Intensity in 10 Cities” had been recorded as a live concert instead of over a series of concerts, it still would have been worth the price of admission. These are 10 songs that simply sound fantastic live and the order they appear is near perfect. If it wasn’t for his introduction of the song before he played, “Put Up or Shut Up” would have been a great show opening song. It’s one that would have definitely gotten the crowd on their feet.

While his trademark work with the guitar is well cemented on the album, it is the third track “My Love is Like a Tire Iron” where he really goes to the ionosphere with it. The long lead solo is simply hypnotic and the same can be said for the solos on “Heads Will Roll,” “Land of a Thousand Dances and of course, the instrumental “The TNT Overature.” Furthermore, his between the songs banter is best on “Jailbait” which is shows his more humourous side. However, the stand out track for me is “I Am a Predator” because that song has many of the elements I have already mentioned.

This mighty combination propels things very nicely to the closer “I Take No Prisoners.” It’s not a bad closer, especially when he works his typical guitar magic, but if I were in the audience and heard that song before he left the stage, I would certainly expect him back to play more. Me personally, like the Mitch character in the book, I would be screaming for him to play “The Great White Buffalo.” His failure to play that song either time I saw him is the only thing I can hold against his performances.

Track Listing:

  1. Put Up or Shut Up
  2. Spontaneous Combustion
  3. My Love is Like a Tire Iron
  4. Jailbait
  5. I Am a Predator
  6. Heads Will Roll
  7. The Flying Lip Lock
  8. Land of a Thousand Dances
  9. The TNT Overature
  10. I Take No Prisoners
Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent- lead vocals, lead guitar

Charlie Huhn- lead and backing vocals, rhythm guitar

Dave Kiswiney- bass, backing vocals

Cliff Davies- drums, backing vocals

So there you have it, a live album that would have sounded great as a concert on its own. Ted Nugent shows why he is so awesome live and puts that down on vinyl, cassette and CD. “Intensity in 10 Cities” is a tribute to a fine musician. BTW, can any of you spot the mistake in this post?

Next post: Hanoi Rocks- Self Destruction Blues

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChidren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

Great Metal Albums of 1982: Ted Nugent- Nugent

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2015 by 80smetalman

NUGENTTED_N

New Wave of British Heavy Metal or NWOBHM had clearly established its dominance around the world in 1982. However, thanks to bands like Riot and Y&T as well as others whose albums will be visited very soon, American metal wasn’t completely silent . Of all the American bands, the one artist who draped himself (and still does) in the American flag was Ted Nugent. In this year, the Motor City Madman put out a studio album and a live one. It is the studio album, “Nugent” that is being visited today.

Another reason why I’ve decided to visit the studio album first was that because of my military obligations, it was another album that passed me by in that year. Yet again, it’s another album I regret missing in 1982. “Nugent” has all the classic trademarks of the things that made Ted Nugent great. Most noteworthy, as is always the case with Ted, is the fact that he can wail on a guitar. His solos are present on each and every song, though the stand out for me is “Good and Ready.” “No, No, No” also comes to mind in this respect.

Apart from his exemplary guitar work, he does write some good songs. It is true that “Bound and Gagged” may be the first inclination of Ted’s feelings of fanatical American patriotism and right wing politics but I know I wouldn’t have noticed or cared back then. It’s still a cool song. That’s one problem with listening to the song with, in this case, the curse of hindsight. I also found myself wanting to sing along to “Fightin’ Words.” “Ebony” might be classed as his attempt at a single but I never heard it on the radio, not that you ever heard much of his material there to begin with. Nevertheless, it’s a decent song.

“Don’t Push Me” is short and to the point and definitely one I would have used to blast out the car window while driving. Note to self, maybe I should make my own CD of driving songs. Anyway back on the subject. The way he lays down the guitar jam while the band is repeating the title works for me in so many ways. If there was one thing I would change on “Nugent” it would be the order of the last two songs. “Tailgunner” is a good song but I thought the one before it “We’re Gonna Rock Tonight” would have been a better closer. It’s just that the lyrics and overall vibe of the song make it a great song to end the album on but that’s just me.

Track Listing:

  1. No, No, No
  2. Bound and Gagged
  3. Habitual Offender
  4. Fightin’ Words
  5. Good and Ready
  6. Ebony
  7. Don’t Push Me
  8. Can’t Stop Me Now
  9. We’re Gonna Rock Tonight
  10. Tailgunner
Ted Nugent

  Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent- lead vocals, lead guitars

Derek St. Holmes- guitar, vocals

Dave Kiswiney- bass, vocals

Carmine Appice- drums, vocals

Larry Brown- percussion

Donnie Backus- piano

Ted Nugent let the world know in 1982 that there was still plenty of good metal in America with his two albums. “Nugent” was one of those and proved that he could still rock with the best of them.

Next post: Manowar- Battle Hyms

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

Great Metal Albums of 1981: Motley Crue- Too Fast for Love

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 9, 2014 by 80smetalman

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Back in 1981, I thought I did a great job keeping up with all the music that was going around at the time, especially considering the fact that I was a bit hampered by serving in the military back then. However, the more I explore this year in music, not only have a drawn the conclusion that 1981 was a killer year for music, I feel slightly sick at my discovery of how many great albums that went past me unnoticed, including this debut album from Motley Crue.

I did hear the album in retrospect after hearing the great follow up to it and I did like it then but hearing it again after such a long lay off, I like it even more. There are some killer jams laid down on this one. The first five songs on this album really get things going here. All of them can be metal classics so I find myself asking “Why aren’t they?” Maybe I will find the answer as I continue the journey through the golden age of heavy metal. Actually, I should say the first six songs because “Piece of the Action” was quite a good belter as well. Again, I don’t take anything away from the rest of the album as they too are decent songs and the title track quite rightly can stand along side the first six. What I conclude was that in 1981, Motley Crue were definitely hungry and that hunger shown in the intensity of “Too Fast For Love.”

Another issue from listening to the album has also surfaced here. I now offer an official apology to Crue guitarist Mick Mars. See, I always had him written down as the worst guitarist in metal but now I withdraw that branding from Mick. Getting things in perspective, I am not going the other way and start comparing him with the likes of Van Halen, Nugent, Rhodes or even Iommi, but “Too Fast For Love,” proves to me that he’s not as bad as I first figured. Mick, if you’re reading this, my most humble apologies.

Track Listing:

1. Live Wire

2. Come and Dance

3. Public Enemy #1

4. Merry Go Round

5. Take Me to the Top

6. Piece of the Action

7. Starry Eyes

8. Too Fast for Love

9. On With the Sh0w

Motley Crue

Motley Crue

Vince Neil- vocals

Nikki Sixx- bass

Mick Mars- guitars

Tommy Lee- drums

“Too Fast For Love” shows Motley Crue at a time when they were hungry and just wanted to create some good in your face heavy metal. As we will see further on down the line, something changed but we can leave that til another day. In the mean time, lets celebrate what has become for me, one of the biggest surprise albums from 1981.

Next post: The Plasmatics- Metal Priestess

To buy Rock and Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

Great Metal Albums of 1980: Ted Nugent- Scream Dream

Posted in 1980s, Heavy Metal, Heavy Metal and the 1980s, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 6, 2013 by 80smetalman

220px-Scream_Dream

I am not one of these redneck, fanatically patriotic, my country right or wrong Americans but I am glad that with all the great British heavy metal bands that thrilled us with killer albums back in 1980, there were some great American metal albums too. Note: I have always loved the fact how the US and UK have supported each other in regards to metal and how that has grown to include Canada and eventually the rest of the world. This is why it was so important that in the pivotal year of 1980, American metal got on the scene as well. Arguably one of the best American metal albums to come out that year was “Scream Dream” by the Motor City Madman, Ted Nugent.

“Scream Dream” is yet another album that makes me proud to shout out “I am a metalhead!” Of course the brilliant opening track “Wango Tango” opens this album with style and the title track is a great one to follow and so on down the line. Every song on this album is a winner and you would have to put two guns to my head to make me choose a clear cut favourite track and then I probably still couldn’t pick one. One aspect that shows up very well on this album is Ted’s versatility on the guitar and how he can wail or shred depending on the dictates of the particular song. “Hard As Nails” and “Flesh And Blood” are true shredders in the classic metal sense. But he is able to go into a more blues based melodic solo on “Spit It Out” and does so like the true pro that he is. Then there’s the next to last song, “Terminus Eldorado” that to me sounds like an early forerunner to his future 1986 hit, “Little Miss Dangerous.” On “Scream Dream,” Terrible Ted proves that you can be versatile while playing some outstanding metal.

Track Listing:

1. Wango Tango

2. Scream Dream

3. Hard As Nails

4. I Gotta Move

5. Violent Love

6. Flesh And Blood

7. Spit It Out

8. Come And Get It

9. Terminus Eldorado

10. Don’t Cry (I’ll Be Back Before You Know It Baby)

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent- lead guitar, lead vocals

Charlie Huhn- rhythm guitar, backing vocals, lead vocals on tracks 4 and 10

Dave Kiswiney- bass, backing vocals

Cliff Davies- drums, lead vocal on track 8

There’s not much more I can say about this album, only that it is metal as metal was intended and yet another great album that was made in a year of great metal albums.

Next Post: AC/DC- Back In Black

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London

 

 

Great Rock Albums of 1979- Ted Nugent- State of Shock

Posted in 1979, films, Heavy Metal, Music, Rock, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2013 by 80smetalman

220px-StateOfShock_TedNugentsalbum

This album has a bit of irony to it for me. As you have probably read many times until your sick to death of it now, I spent three months of 1979 in musical isolation. Actually it was Marine Corps boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina, known in the film “Full Metal Jacket” as the home for the crazy brave. At the time, many of us referred to it as the land of sun and sandfleas. I digress. During those three months, I had no information of what music was coming out. Then one night, I pulled a guard duty where a radio was playing nearby. I was able to listen to it and several times during my duty, there was an advertisement for tickets to see Ted Nugent’s always kick ass live show in Savannah, Georgia. I concluded that he must have a new album out and when I went home on leave, five weeks later, I saw the “State of Shock” album at my local store.

When I first heard the album all of those long years ago, I thought it was brilliant, although it could be said that it was because I was musically starved at the time. Killer tracks like “Paralyzed” and “Satisfied” still come to mind and show what a true artist Ted Nugent is and how he can wail on a guitar like very few people could both then and now. The problem for me is time, having refamiliarised myself with the album, I am now in the mind that it doesn’t quite live up to the knock out punch of “Cat Scratch Fever,” Weekend Warriors” or the later “Scream Dream.” Still, there is nothing wrong with the album, it is still a great album with some fine guitar work from the master himself.

Track Listing:

1. Paralyzed

2. Take It Or Leave It

3. Alone

4. It Don’t Matter

5. State of Shock

6. I  Want To Tell You

7. Satisfied

8. Bite Down Hard

9. Snake Charmer

10. Saddle Sore

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent- lead guitar, vocals

Charlie Huhn- rhythm guitar, lead and backing vocals

Walt Monaghan- bass

Cliff Davies- drums, backing vocals

Let’s not get into an argument on whether “State of Shock” compares to some of the other Ted Nugent classics. It is a good album and for me, it was a great reintroduction back into music after being deprived of it for so long.

Next Post: Triumph- Just a Game

To buy Rock And Roll Children, go to http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/RockAndRollChildren.html

Also available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Froogle and on sale at Foyles Book Shop in London